Yamaha R6 Forum: YZF-R6 Forums banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Newb here in need of some advice about the 2nd Gen or R6s. Several years ago I switched from a 2003 Honda 600RR to a 2000 F4 and was immediately more comfortable and faster. I'm not really sure why but I guess it is what it is. The 600RR felt like an instrument and the F4 felt like a toy. I was running intermediate club race times.

I'm trying to put together another track bike and the F4i is my first choice but they are hard to come by, parts are scarce and every dime I put into it will be lost..

So what about the 2nd Gen R6? I've noticed the ergos are closer to the F4i's than my 600RR, with the lower seat height and triples above the clamp. How easy is it to go fast on one? I've read the frame is super-stiff, like R7 stiff. Is that a good thing or bad for someone that's not a profesional?

Thanks in advance!:smile:
 

·
sell me a red powerband
Joined
·
728 Posts
In the middle of building my 05 for the track. I don't think there is a gigantic disadvantage to the second generation. Obviously it isn't the newest and greatest. But on a budget I think it serves the purpose just great. Finding parts isn't terrible either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I've had a couple of people say it takes a pretty damn good rider to go faster on the 3rd gen over a 2nd. I'm on a budget as well so the 2nd gen is what's I'm looking at. What are they like to ride though?
 

·
sell me a red powerband
Joined
·
728 Posts
I could believe that, I myself have only ridden a 3rd gen a number of times. As far as second gens go try your hardest to get an 05. If definitely is their best year, it has better forks and bigger throttle bodies.

As far as how they ride I think that's all up to setup. You can get the front resprung for your weight (or even revalved). And get a new rear shock, or just resprung. Some adjustable clip ons and adjustable rearsets and you're laughing. I'm 6'2" and the bike is totally fine for me as far as setup is concerned. The gearing also plays a difference, depending on your track and what gears you want to be in.

Keep in mind they are a race bike, they were competitive 10 years ago and they're still competitive now. They take a little more work to get them ready for the track, compared to a 3rd gen. But I don't think I'll be outriding my bike with my ability this upcoming season.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Well I'd definitely have the forks re-valved and put a Penske or Ohlins rear shock all by someone that has lots of experience with the bike. When you say I'll be laughing, you mean because it will handle so well?
 

·
sell me a red powerband
Joined
·
728 Posts
Good call, and you can always find one used so just keep your eye out. And yes the handing difference from those main 4 (front forks, rear shock, rear sets and clip on). It's a significant improvement over stock.
 

·
Meh
Joined
·
9,250 Posts
I've heard a lot of way-more-experience-than-me racers declare the 2nd gen R6 to be one of the best sportbike chassis ever, and is generally easier to ride than the 3rd gen, but the 3rd gen is all-out faster when ridden by someone who really knows what they're doing.

There's a dude on here, Melk-Man who's the #1 plate holder for WERA Southwest (or CCS?) and has ridden R6s his whole career, and his fastest lap at Jennings was set on a 2nd gen.

Clif Notes: The 2nd gen can still get down and is easy to ride. If you want to compete for expert-level podiums, get a 3rd gen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Well suddenly I found a 2006 fully race prepped for a great price. I was all set to build an S but this would save me thousands and thousands.

7100 miles, 3000 of which are track on the stock motor. He has paperwork and pictures to prove all this. Will I need to worry about the motor giving up anytime soon?
 

·
sell me a red powerband
Joined
·
728 Posts
You could get a compression and leakdown, unsure what your local rates are. Generally racers aren't trying to screw you, if they intend to continue racing at the same track as you, word can get around pretty quick. They may not be aware of everything that is wrong with the bike, a slight wobble to them could be something much more severe.

But if they have records of the maintenance of the bike and key items aren't wrong (such as the chain not looking neglected). You can generally assume they treated the bike okay.

I for example just bought one, with everything looking okay and the bike mechanically sound, my mechanic found a lot more underneath the surface. My $1000 suspension budget went up exponentially and I had a lot of unforeseen repairs to do...

Ask for all of the take offs too aha, they can help recuperate any costs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
You could get a compression and leakdown, unsure what your local rates are. Generally racers aren't trying to screw you, if they intend to continue racing at the same track as you, word can get around pretty quick. They may not be aware of everything that is wrong with the bike, a slight wobble to them could be something much more severe.

But if they have records of the maintenance of the bike and key items aren't wrong (such as the chain not looking neglected). You can generally assume they treated the bike okay.

I for example just bought one, with everything looking okay and the bike mechanically sound, my mechanic found a lot more underneath the surface. My $1000 suspension budget went up exponentially and I had a lot of unforeseen repairs to do...

Ask for all of the take offs too aha, they can help recuperate any costs.
I'm real close to buying a 2004 with 10,800 miles. Supposedly less than 2000 were on the track. It's fully prepped, Penske, Scotts, cases, Akro, dyno tuned. Needs nothing and he wants $3500. Clean title, original owner too.

He does plan to continue racing locally and seems like a really good guy. I can't ride it because it just snowed a foot around here but we started it up and I was very impressed with how smooth and quiet the the engine was. One of the quietest I've ever heard actually.

Being a racebike, do I need to worry about the clutch and tranny? And is this a good deal?
 

·
Meh
Joined
·
9,250 Posts
Race starts are pretty brutal on the clutch. If you're just doing track days, and it's not slipping at the top of 2nd gear, it'll probably be good for awhile.

If you're racing, and you have no info on when the clutch was last done, you might want to pick up some clutch plates to throw in the spares box in case it goes on you mid-weekend.
 

·
Hey...watch this
Joined
·
574 Posts
My track bike is an 06 R6S. I've added traxxion forks and a Penske shock. I'm still tweaking the suspension, but I love the way it handles. It's predictable and it give lots of feedback. The Scott's damper was a huge improvement, it has saved me 3-4 times. I've never ridden a gen3.
 

·
sell me a red powerband
Joined
·
728 Posts
Sounds like a decent price to me, hard to establish a deal because a bike without a title in poor condition goes for that in my area.

Get all the take offs you can, also +1 to the clutch. Also if the bike is already sprung for your weight that's money saved, If it isn't I would highly recommend doing so as if would make the experience that much better.

Hope it all works out, post pictures once you're done!!
 

·
"The Dude abides .. "
Joined
·
4,719 Posts
Newb here in need of some advice about the 2nd Gen or R6s. Several years ago I switched from a 2003 Honda 600RR to a 2000 F4 and was immediately more comfortable and faster. I'm not really sure why but I guess it is what it is. The 600RR felt like an instrument and the F4 felt like a toy. I was running intermediate club race times.

I'm trying to put together another track bike and the F4i is my first choice but they are hard to come by, parts are scarce and every dime I put into it will be lost..

So what about the 2nd Gen R6? I've noticed the ergos are closer to the F4i's than my 600RR, with the lower seat height and triples above the clamp. How easy is it to go fast on one? I've read the frame is super-stiff, like R7 stiff. Is that a good thing or bad for someone that's not a profesional?

Thanks in advance!:smile:
the 2nd gen r6 is a fantastic track bike. don't let anyone tell you otherwise. I raced an 03, 04, a pair of 05's.. and the 2006-07 3rd gen was a sorry replacement at most tracks to the strong midrange of the 03-05 (s) bike. And the better feel of the front end on the 2nd gen makes it easier for MOST riders to go faster. The 3rd gen bike can get around the track faster, but it usually takes a better rider to get good feel out of the stiffer frame and front end.
And the 2nd gen motor is awesome. OVER 10hp more midrange than the 06-07, and SAME as the 08-current bike..

The electronics can make the 3rd gen a little better, and the slipper is decent (but not great) but the 2nd gen is a very good bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
The one I wanted sold before I could grab it. I found a beautiful 3rd gen/ Ex-AMA bike. I'm a little concerned about it not being very user friendly, as I've read. Does it take excessive skill to go fast on one?
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top