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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I hit the track 2nd time yesterday. First time was last month going on slow and learning on positioning. Yesterday was much more fun as concentration was to find better lines and pushing slightly along the bend. A friend of mine took my timing and the timing was improving and improving. However, this is what happened that I quit and call it a day.

1. Few times my front tire slipped while negotiating the bend initially I thought it the side walls that cannot take or grip the tarmac. (Btw, this i realise during my first session. So not much speed involved thus bike didnt low side)

2. Yesterday, as i was riding slightly harder and getting my lines, i finally realised that its true that my front tire seriously cannot grip the tarmac. I noticed the following

- upon diving into the corner, front feels light. No feedback or solid traction.
- into the corner on a hard dip, it feels like Im riding a bicycle with little air in the front tyre causing it to "squeeze" and slip as i was cornering.
- in the corner, as i leaned more and more, the front side walls are giving away
- tire wear: rear tire side wall used up all the way
front tire side wall theres chicken strip almost 1 inch

So need experts to give me an advice, issit a tire issue or front fork set up.

Kinda confuse, coz rear tire is ok and i've adjust my rear shocks to the guidelines for a suspension setup and it feels great. I've been reading in this forum that wheel spin here and there and blaming the tire.
 

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Don't worry about the unused strip on the front... when when I was using 120/180 I would run out the entire rear but had a little left on the front. Now I'm using 125/200 and I'll be dragging bodywork before I reach the edge of either tire.

But sounds like a suspension/geometry setup, as already mentioned. I experienced this nose-dive and slide feeling with a shitty web-based "recommended suspension settings".
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Bike is a 2012 r6
Stock oem q2 tires
Stock forks and shocks
Tire pressure 29front 29rear

What's a geometry issue? A local shop can only set my front and rear sag. About compression and rebound, how would they know what to set unless they were to tag along with me to track and I can give them my feedback. That's why I followed those shitty web-based recommended setup and I adjust accordingly on my riding feel. For my forks I didn't really adjust. I only adjusted the sag for my rear shocks and based on my riding feel I adjusted my rear rebound and compression.
 

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Parts Pimp
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Bike is a 2012 r6
Stock oem q2 tires
Stock forks and shocks
Tire pressure 29front 29rear

What's a geometry issue? A local shop can only set my front and rear sag. About compression and rebound, how would they know what to set unless they were to tag along with me to track and I can give them my feedback. That's why I followed those shitty web-based recommended setup and I adjust accordingly on my riding feel. For my forks I didn't really adjust. I only adjusted the sag for my rear shocks and based on my riding feel I adjusted my rear rebound and compression.
The OEM tires are horrible. That's an issue there to start. But it's not like you can't get around on them.

29 PSI may be too low for those tires. I don't really know any recommended pressure to tell you cause the only person I know who ran em at the track was Steve/picpocket until he low sided and never ran em again.

Geometry chnages occur when you move the forks in the triple clamp or add or remove the shim on the rear shock, etc.

What's your weight and what was the setup you got online?

How many steps up the clicker is the rear preload from the lowest point?

I'm sure the front not being planted has a lot to do with your rebound as well. If you've never touched it and it's new, it's gonna be way to fast on the rebound. Every OEM R6 I've bounced is super fast on the front rebound. The valving is so close to being incorrect for the OEM springs that you will almost always end up with it set all the way slow and 1-2 clicks in cause you don't wanna run any adjustment all the way.

A local shop, or you and a couple pals should set your sag. Then you go from there. Nobody has a perfect setup and everyone sets up the bike differently. There's plenty of very reputable people I've seen setup an R6 and try and put the front forks flush in hopes for more trail, etc. Then the bike just runs crazy wide on the exits of turns, but people wouldn't have tried it if it didn't work for someone's bike at some point in time....

Regardless, if you're front end is very low and the rear of the bike is very high, whether it be sag or ride height, you will find yourself running out of rear tire and having plenty left on the front.

It's been said that you eliminate your rear chicken strips by riding fast through turns, etc and you eliminate the front ones by braking into and in turns. It's not 1005 true, but the part about braking into turns forces the front lower on the bike, changes the geometry and you use the whole tire..

But like Azim said, don't worry about your chicken strips unless it's a situation like this where the front vs rear is drastically different. It's hard to use an entire front tire to begin with, so don't sweat if you have a tiny bit left eventually once you set the bike up correctly.

And rider feedback is the most important factor to a bike setup whether it be suspension, engine tuning, tires, etc.. A good baseline is where you start and from there on, it's primarily rider feedback, reading tire wear, and times....
 

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Why yes I don't!!!!!!!!!!
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OEMs are Q2s or qualifiers?? I hated the OEM qualifiers... and they felt skiddish at any pressure
 

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Ride Safely
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Stock tires are the Qualifiers.....when i first got my bike didnt feel safe at all so i got me a set of the Q2s felt alot safer and more grip and that was for street use.... now after hitting the track Q2s aren`t the best eighter.
 

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Dangerously Irish
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Obama MUST go!!!
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Stock qualifiers slid all over the place for me. Get some decent tires and let the track tech (click adjuster guy) set it up for you. My bike felt like a different bike after the track tech made a few adjustments. Bike went from a little twitchy to grabbing the corners, and with that my time's sped up due to confidence and good steering feedback.
 

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Stock tires are the Qualifiers.....when i first got my bike didnt feel safe at all so i got me a set of the Q2s felt alot safer and more grip and that was for street use.... now after hitting the track Q2s aren`t the best eighter.
I highly doubt that on your second track day you're out-riding the Q2s
I think your tire pressures may have been low for that tire, see the link below,

http://dunlopracing.com/technical-info/

I ran Q2' through Advanced, and Besides that's the tire they run at CSS
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I wasn't on Q2s. I was on stock OEM Qualifiers.

I set my rear sag to the last clicker whereby the preload is the most. my weight is 70kg with my gears. compression wise i adjust based on my feeling. What i can say is that i increase the compression.

Front forks, a mech ever so called "set" it for me based on my description but after that I did not touch it. He touched on rebound and low compression.

SO i guess what went wrong totally is my front and rear suspension setup right? (dont mentioned about the useless OEM qualifiers. coz im aware of it)

Im kinda clueless how to set my suspensions correctly. Now its not on stock settings. Give me an enlightenment guys. Feels shitty without able to control the bike properly.
 

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iRun
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The OEM tires are horrible. That's an issue there to start. But it's not like you can't get around on them.

29 PSI may be too low for those tires. I don't really know any recommended pressure to tell you cause the only person I know who ran em at the track was Steve/picpocket until he low sided and never ran em again.

Geometry chnages occur when you move the forks in the triple clamp or add or remove the shim on the rear shock, etc.

What's your weight and what was the setup you got online?

How many steps up the clicker is the rear preload from the lowest point?

I'm sure the front not being planted has a lot to do with your rebound as well. If you've never touched it and it's new, it's gonna be way to fast on the rebound. Every OEM R6 I've bounced is super fast on the front rebound. The valving is so close to being incorrect for the OEM springs that you will almost always end up with it set all the way slow and 1-2 clicks in cause you don't wanna run any adjustment all the way.

A local shop, or you and a couple pals should set your sag. Then you go from there. Nobody has a perfect setup and everyone sets up the bike differently. There's plenty of very reputable people I've seen setup an R6 and try and put the front forks flush in hopes for more trail, etc. Then the bike just runs crazy wide on the exits of turns, but people wouldn't have tried it if it didn't work for someone's bike at some point in time....

Regardless, if you're front end is very low and the rear of the bike is very high, whether it be sag or ride height, you will find yourself running out of rear tire and having plenty left on the front.

It's been said that you eliminate your rear chicken strips by riding fast through turns, etc and you eliminate the front ones by braking into and in turns. It's not 1005 true, but the part about braking into turns forces the front lower on the bike, changes the geometry and you use the whole tire..

But like Azim said, don't worry about your chicken strips unless it's a situation like this where the front vs rear is drastically different. It's hard to use an entire front tire to begin with, so don't sweat if you have a tiny bit left eventually once you set the bike up correctly.

And rider feedback is the most important factor to a bike setup whether it be suspension, engine tuning, tires, etc.. A good baseline is where you start and from there on, it's primarily rider feedback, reading tire wear, and times....
That about sums it up. :laugh

Stock tires are the Qualifiers.....when i first got my bike didnt feel safe at all so i got me a set of the Q2s felt alot safer and more grip and that was for street use.... now after hitting the track Q2s aren`t the best eighter.
Q2s are some great tires man.. I've seen people go from Dunlop DOTs to Q2s and not have to adjust their pace all that much. :fact
 

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Q2s are a great overall tire for beginners/intermediates... a very predictable and forgiving tire, easy to get up to operating temps....

The stock Qualifiers are garbage for the track, I would not run them in anything more than beginner/green pace.
 
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