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Hello everyone, im here for opinions about getting an R6.

I am not a newbie on riding motorcycles but its been 10yrs seen ive ridden in one. Im from southeast asia and moved to north america.

i learned to ride when i was about grade 4 on a 100cc Yamaha Force1(4 speed, no clutch). Then ride on a honda TMX 155cc(4 speed, with clutch).

i was young and dumb at 14yrs of age and i got into an accident(mild scratches). So i left riding motorcycles behind.

now at 25 ive driven cars and semi trucks. So my question is, is it ok to start riding on a 600cc.

it is only for daily commute to work and back and off days drive around.
I will be riding at the speed limit as i cant afford tickets, and i care for my life as I have my own family to raise now.

Im considering the R3 as it is more affordable but i like the looks of R6 better.
Long post , thanks everyone.
 

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Well it has real potential to tease out more speed then is actually prudent for the road conditions. This can allow for the various improper speed related accidents. Obviously some can ride a big, powerful motorcycle with the basic controls experience without dieing or totaling the bike. Then some can't because they are "squids." No shirt, flip flops or barefoot, and doing dumb stuff giving us a bad rap like how loud ass harley pipes make people assume noise means speed.
 

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Short answer is yes, you absolutely can start riding on a 600cc. The 250/300cc bikes are probably more suitable in every way, but there's not much that's radically different below 5-8k RPM, at least to the point where it's possible for use as a starter bike.

I'd never ridden a motorcycle in my life, threw a leg over an R6 and in 10 minutes was riding around no problem. Probably 3 minutes of that was figuring out why the bike stalled when I put it in gear lol. Now, that approach can be a MAJOR issue with someone that doesn't understand things like braking or turning. You could lock up the front brake, overbrake in a corner (tuck the front or straighten up and go wide), steer the wrong way, etc etc. That wasn't an issue for me and it sounds like it won't be an issue for you having ridden motorcycles before. Those issues could also happen on any motorcycle, but there's more potential on a 600 due to more power and better brakes.

I did go with a used bike (2005), which was the better option for me. I ended up hitting a guard rail on a mountain road. Only because I was trying to be an idiot and memorize the road, I turned sharper than I should have anticipating a 90° turn. I tried to save it in the corner, but the road surface wasn't great and I just went into the parking pullout in the opposite side of the road. Couldn't stop in time with all the painted parking markers, and met the rail @ 10mph very low angle hah. Saved my forks from bending but the bike bounced harshly and I actually got way more damage from dropping it on the other side. I probably would have crashed just as hard if not worse if I was on a 250/300. "It's more fun to drive a slow car fast than a fast car slow" type of thing.

Buying a used bike has a lot of benefits, but there's some things you'll want to consider. They're cheaper up front, replacement parts are around, maintenance is often easier, etc. New bikes are a lot more safe and a lot more user friendly (ABS, TCS, engine maps at the push of a button, etc) than older bikes, but they cost a lot of money to lay down...way more than an older bike.

I was going to get a 90s Ninja 250 (I'm a Kawasaki guy) but they cost as much as the R6 I got and that was all there is to it. I've had a few accidental wheelies and that's to be expected from a 95 whp crotch rocket. I also had an experience where I stood up and used my left had to rearrange my berries. I guess I twisted the throttle when I took my left hand off and it pulled hard as hell even though I was low speed in 6th gear. Just things to think about.
 

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YZFR6... ooodles of HP
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Adjust your twig and berries? Hope that it didn't get followed up by a extract the seat from your ass..
 
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As long as you are capable of riding within your limits and you respect your bike, you should be fine. I think the fact that you are posting here shows that you are putting some thought into what might be a good bike and why and that is the first step. Have you considered including in your budget some kind of advanced rider training to ensure you are practicing correct skills and techniques? I'm a coach with the California Superbike School so I'm happy to answer any questions you might have about training options. I think that putting focus on being the best, most informed rider possible is important, no matter what first bike you choose :)
 

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YZFR6... ooodles of HP
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My local msf classes disappeared.
 

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Have you considered including in your budget some kind of advanced rider training to ensure you are practicing correct skills and techniques?
Would you say the entry level ones (where you get your full license for 3-400 dollars) are a total rip off? The only conceivable benefit is that you don't have to take your big hurkin 600 (lol) through the course, you take a little bike and don't instantly fail if you mess up. For me, it would have saved 3 dollars a year on insurance. Better off spent on a helmet or maybe even something like gear insurance.

Advanced courses, totally worth it but a new rider might need a few hundred hours in the seat to comprehend and apply what's being taught.
 

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Ten years is still like starting over; it's just that you have a shorter learning curve. A lot of guys get injured because they hop-on after six months and take-off like they just got off it yesterday; overconfidence.

One word... restraint. If you can exercise restraint, you can ride a relatively lightweight 599cc bike. Are you a defensive driver? Do you pay attention primarily to what's right in front of your bumper or are you looking and analyzing everything way down the road? If not, stick to four wheels. In addition to being defensive, on two you must also keep an eye on your six... potentially more difficult without the benefit of a dedicated rearview mirror. Other than throttle and weight, there isn't much difference between this and the R3. If cost is a factor then definitely go for the R3. Bikes might be lighter on fuel costs, but probably make up for it on maintenance items like tires... and that's with you doing all the work yourself while avoiding hospital bills. Sport bikes are not engineered for cold weather; primarily limited by the tiny batteries and potential over-cooling.
 

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I'm on my 5th rear tire, and the front is about to get number 4. Also a chain and sprockets. All in 27k miles (1 year). R6 eats these tires! I didn't factor 3 to 4 months per rear.
 

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the best teacher for riding skills is a mini bike. I used to have a standing offer for street riders to let them borrow my setup mini bike to turn some laps. They had to provide their own protection... ie leathers. Guess how many took me up on the offer? They all acted like riding a 100cc bike was beneath them which amused me. When you have proper instruction the confidence will come. I dont care how many hundreds of thousands of miles one rides on the street... it doesnt mean anything until you are on a closed course.
Also this statement is patently false
New bikes are a lot more safe and a lot more user friendly (ABS, TCS, engine maps at the push of a button, etc) than older bikes, but they cost a lot of money to lay down...way more than an older bike.
ABS is a friggen joke on motorbikes. In wet conditions it increases your survival chances marginally... outside of that single condition you never want an ABS module doing your braking. Traction control is throttle control... another skill that must be developed.
Braking is a skill that must be developed & practiced. No ifs ands, or buts about it. This is where I disagree with the MSF or similar safety courses. Also the "2 types of riders" (those that have crashed & those that will) adage annoys me as well.
If I were teaching a new rider... they'd be properly geared up and then Id make them crash on grass or dirt. Get the emotional trauma out of the way and show its only a mental thing. Pick yourself & the bike up and move on. Also those that start on the street never had any crash or biff experience so they view it as a failure. The top riders in the world crash on a regular basis...
 

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Note: Skills and safety aren't always directly related; and the two shouldn't be confused.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Ten years is still like starting over; it's just that you have a shorter learning curve. A lot of guys get injured because they hop-on after six months and take-off like they just got off it yesterday; overconfidence.

One word... restraint. If you can exercise restraint, you can ride a relatively lightweight 599cc bike. Are you a defensive driver? Do you pay attention primarily to what's right in front of your bumper or are you looking and analyzing everything way down the road? If not, stick to four wheels. In addition to being defensive, on two you must also keep an eye on your six... potentially more difficult without the benefit of a dedicated rearview mirror. Other than throttle and weight, there isn't much difference between this and the R3. If cost is a factor then definitely go for the R3. Bikes might be lighter on fuel costs, but probably make up for it on maintenance items like tires... and that's with you doing all the work yourself while avoiding hospital bills. Sport bikes are not engineered for cold weather; primarily limited by the tiny batteries and potential over-cooling.
Thanks u guys for the reply.
Yes 10 long yrs have passed since i last touched a motorcycle. I might consider a used bike just to start over again.
Defensive driving is a yes, having driven 5ton trucks i have to look out very far to analyze whats ahead so i decide the course of action if something happened on the road.

I get cutoff by little half tons on the road so i let off gas to give me a safe following distance. As far as mirrors, im used to using my side mirrors and not relying on rear view mirrors anymore.


anyway it will be 80% commute for me so just the posted speed limit, no speeding for me as i dont want to get tickets and i have a family to go home to.

i will decide once i go to my local motorcycle shop.
Oh and btw im about 155ish lbs 5'6, will i have a hard time handling the bike?
Thank you.
 

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Note: Skills and safety aren't always directly related; and the two shouldn't be confused.
in regards to what?
Do you have the ability to control the bike? Skills
Do you have the proper gear? Safety

Did you check the tire pressure recently? Safety
 

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@TurboBlew - Safety is making the right decisions; avoiding situations that put others/you at elevated risk; ride within your skill level. Skill is being able to handle the bike; important for the uncommon and unexpected. Keep in mind that track and street have different, sometimes incompatible goals. You can be "Mr. Wonderful" on the track but "A Terror" on the streets and vice-versa. You may be the most skilled ("top rider") with a gazillion miles and tens of crashes on the track, but if you're routinely making poor decisions then one will fail on the street; more especially if aren't doing things as basic as exercising proper lane-shift... or treating every age and type of pavement the same... or assuming public road conditions are as predictable as a track. Impromptu/Unorganized races on public roads most often aren't about who's machine is the fastest or which driver/rider is the most skilled, but far more often about who's the craziest or most daring. Races on tracks are far more technical by comparison.


@VergelGio - Yeah you have a CDL to protect. I have a lot of respect for truck drivers; the skill and the sh* y'all put up with as professionals operating among a bunch of amateurs. My neighbor was an over-the-road truck driver. Spent a lot of time out of town so by the time he got back, would have too much to do to enjoy his new motorcycle purchase. One poor decision (buzzed-riding) lead to excessive speed for the conditions (cruiser) and skill-level (steering under heavy brake), leading to a wreck with no helmet. Broken elbow, brain-injury lead to no work, loss of truck. Hurting head, elbow, pride, more drinking; wife fighting cancer lost him for good. I feel involved because I failed to recognize that he was buzzed; and failed to notice he wasn't wearing his helmet until we were out on the main road. (and know he's declined riding before due to having a drink in him)
 

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@TurboBlew - Safety is making the right decisions; avoiding situations that put others/you at elevated risk; ride within your skill level. Skill is being able to handle the bike; important for the uncommon and unexpected. Keep in mind that track and street have different, sometimes incompatible goals. You can be "Mr. Wonderful" on the track but "A Terror" on the streets and vice-versa. You may be the most skilled ("top rider") with a gazillion miles and tens of crashes on the track, but if you're routinely making poor decisions then one will fail on the street; more especially if aren't doing things as basic as exercising proper lane-shift... or treating every age and type of pavement the same... or assuming public road conditions are as predictable as a track. Impromptu/Unorganized races on public roads most often aren't about who's machine is the fastest or which driver/rider is the most skilled, but far more often about who's the craziest or most daring. Races on tracks are far more technical by comparison.
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of course and why I feel the street is really no place for beginners to start. Ive seen fresh meat out of an MSF course not able to negotiate a simple right turn or even a figure 8 without putting their feet down. Something I could do at 10yrs of age. In that particular instance I feel like the MSF should simulate more guaranteed fail incidents to get riders over that initial emotional crash shock. Cant tell you how many riders Ive seen leave the hobby over a small incident caused by their own undeveloped skills. Mostly egotistical blowhards riding... er I mean barely hanging onto hyperbores. Whats amusing is every so often Ill run into someone that doesnt ride anymore but has some "had to layer down" story. Ive been at this a long time and Im still learning & hopefully wont stop til the day my heart stops beating.

Just to give you an example... lets just pretend a new rider spends $2,000 on a new suit, helmet boots, & other assorted protective gear. They dont look at the cost of the gear as a discount on potential injury or rehab costs... no they look at is as hoping to get 80-90% of their purchase price back on resale for being lightly used. Admittedly nobody mentally prepares for a crash... which I think the minibikes do help tremendously. Worst case you scuff some gear and bend a $14 lever or $20 peg. Thats fear... a huge obstacle for anyone not accustomed.

You cant make sound decisions IF you dont know the limits of your ability. This is why I feel like a closed course is a much better platform to learn. Doesnt matter if its a Goldwing or a CX500, discs or drum brakes, bias ply or radial tires, etc.

And yes I agree...elevated pace rides on the street are all about who is the biggest risk taker. Something Ive had many close calls with and could have been curbed had I taken a more proactive approach to my riding. I can still have fun... I just use a more subdued vehicle like a scooter to enjoy the elevated pace without endangering others
 

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ABS is a friggen joke on motorbikes. In wet conditions it increases your survival chances marginally... outside of that single condition you never want an ABS module doing your braking. Traction control is throttle control... another skill that must be developed.
Braking is a skill that must be developed & practiced. No ifs ands, or buts about it.
I can agree with that the skills aspect of course. I've never actually been on a motorcycle with all those electronics, but they seem like the have their uses. I've done many emergency stops in my car, and I've only seen the ABS light once. Night time, coming home from school, Chrysler headlights from 2006 (aka worthless), and someone's big ol black dog runs right out in front of me while I'm going 50mph. Out of instinct I just slammed fully on the brakes and stopped about a car length away from his dumb ass. If I was in my 80s truck and did the same thing, I'd probably have killed the dog and if I was on my bike I'd have been on the ground hard.

I've watched some comparison videos of ABS vs non ABS, and the ABS always comes out on top. At least when it comes to not slamming on the brakes. I don't know about you, but I can't regain traction 15 times per second no matter how many classes I take or how much practice I do :)

Crashing a bike is what you make of it. When I crashed mine, I got up, shut my bike off, picked it up and checked over it and myself (myself being my just purchased RF-1200). I made sure the forks weren't bent and checked the impact points to make sure the brakes weren't damaged and my frame wasn't cracked at the stem. All was good and I rode for the rest of the day.
 

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I can agree with that the skills aspect of course. I've never actually been on a motorcycle with all those electronics, but they seem like the have their uses. I've done many emergency stops in my car, and I've only seen the ABS light once. Night time, coming home from school, Chrysler headlights from 2006 (aka worthless), and someone's big ol black dog runs right out in front of me while I'm going 50mph. Out of instinct I just slammed fully on the brakes and stopped about a car length away from his dumb ass. If I was in my 80s truck and did the same thing, I'd probably have killed the dog and if I was on my bike I'd have been on the ground hard.

I've watched some comparison videos of ABS vs non ABS, and the ABS always comes out on top. At least when it comes to not slamming on the brakes. I don't know about you, but I can't regain traction 15 times per second no matter how many classes I take or how much practice I do :)

Crashing a bike is what you make of it. When I crashed mine, I got up, shut my bike off, picked it up and checked over it and myself (myself being my just purchased RF-1200). I made sure the forks weren't bent and checked the impact points to make sure the brakes weren't damaged and my frame wasn't cracked at the stem. All was good and I rode for the rest of the day.
Thats just it... youre thinking a computer is better... its not. In a car with all kinds of wheelspeed sensors and what nots... sure maybe to an unskilled driver. A driver that has been properly trained would not need ABS and could stop much faster than an untrained one. So for the guise of safety... people take the easy way out instead of developing real driving skill. Its not any safer on a motorbike with traction control or ABS. Show me one club or national level motorcycle racer that uses ABS... Ill gladly concede the point. BTW many OEMs offer non ABS models for contingency racing. Why do you think that is?? Does the highest level of auto racing (Formula 1) permit ABS?? No you say?? Why not? :D

I had a friend try to miss a deer on his motorbike... it cost him a leg, broken bones,and about 2 years rehab. He was of the belief he could ride at an elevated pace but in reality he could have hit the deer and brought the bike to a stop on a paved surface instead of exiting into forestry where a tree took his leg and broke some other bones. He had to be winched out via stretcher he was that far in the woods. I have no doubt his recovery would have been quicker but his bike would have likely sustained being a total loss. Something his ego could not tolerate.

The crash thing isnt a one size fits all but I promise that street riders view it as a failure and non riders have no concept. And it really is because so little time is invested into ride skill.
 

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Thats just it... youre thinking a computer is better... its not. In a car with all kinds of wheelspeed sensors and what nots... sure maybe to an unskilled driver. A driver that has been properly trained would not need ABS and could stop much faster than an untrained one. So for the guise of safety... people take the easy way out instead of developing real driving skill. Its not any safer on a motorbike with traction control or ABS. Show me one club or national level motorcycle racer that uses ABS... Ill gladly concede the point. BTW many OEMs offer non ABS models for contingency racing. Why do you think that is?? Does the highest level of auto racing (Formula 1) permit ABS?? No you say?? Why not? :D

I had a friend try to miss a deer on his motorbike... it cost him a leg, broken bones,and about 2 years rehab. He was of the belief he could ride at an elevated pace but in reality he could have hit the deer and brought the bike to a stop on a paved surface instead of exiting into forestry where a tree took his leg and broke some other bones. He had to be winched out via stretcher he was that far in the woods. I have no doubt his recovery would have been quicker but his bike would have likely sustained being a total loss. Something his ego could not tolerate.

The crash thing isnt a one size fits all but I promise that street riders view it as a failure and non riders have no concept. And it really is because so little time is invested into ride skill.
You're arguing apples to oranges here. The objective facts are that ABS models are statistically safer than non ABS models. 37% lower fatal crash rate between non ABS and ABS bikes of the same model. There's a myriad of reasons why track guys don't use certain things found on street vehicles. Just cause Marc Marquez rides a bike with no headlights, your street bike shouldn't have headlights?? They're riding around a silky smooth circuit with no traffic, no gravel, no road hazards. They crash? They go into a gravel pit...MAYBE a tire wall. Totally different than tucking your front tire on the street and ending up underneath an oncoming car. The reality of it is that although these guys might not have mirrors, headlights, ABS, etc on their race bikes, they have them on their personal bikes. Rossi's custom XJR1300 is equipped with ABS. ABS changes the way a bike corners on the track and would also remove a lot of the competitive nature of racing if everyone braked exactly the same way.

Not everyone has an extra 1000-1500 dollars to spend on an ABS bike. Just because McDonald's sells the most burgers, doesn't mean they have the best burgers. It's pretty much a given that the average consumer would buy something for $10.97 over something that's $10.99, even if the latter had more product.

If you just want to commute around town, there's no reason not to get an ABS bike. If you want to be billy badass and spend 300 bucks times 10 riding courses, go for it.
 

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Would you say the entry level ones (where you get your full license for 3-400 dollars) are a total rip off? The only conceivable benefit is that you don't have to take your big hurkin 600 (lol) through the course, you take a little bike and don't instantly fail if you mess up. For me, it would have saved 3 dollars a year on insurance. Better off spent on a helmet or maybe even something like gear insurance.

Advanced courses, totally worth it but a new rider might need a few hundred hours in the seat to comprehend and apply what's being taught.
No I don't think those beginner courses are a total rip off. I do think there are more reputable schools than others so you may want to look around at what is offered. It's helpful to have them run you through the entire course on their bikes, you get your license and then you move on.

As for advanced courses, I think a lot of people feel like they might need a few hundred hours in the seat before attending but I have the opposite feelings. At the California Superbike School, we will take riders that know how to operate the controls of the bike and can ride without paying much attention to those controls. Meaning simply they can ride enough, around town, on the highway, they can start and stop without thinking about it too much, but it doesn't necessarily mean they have hundreds of hours of seat time. I suggest to all new riders that they take an advanced course ASAP because what that does is prevents bad habits from forming first, and you can build a good solid foundation of PROPER riding technique so that you truly know, understand and have the skills to ride correctly. THEN you can spend some of those hundreds of hours practicing what you have learned.

I'll use myself as an example. I learned to ride at the age of 24, practicing on a friend's borrowed bike. I never took beginners or an advanced course but I picked it up quickly. I rode a ton, but I rode stupid and fast on the street and had two minor crashes (that were deemed to be the fault of the drivers) but looking back I certainly could have done more to prevent them. I started racing (with NO instruction except on day at new racer school) and then surprisingly was doing quite well but crashing a lot. Then I had a wonderful sponsor send me to all four levels of the California Superbike School which literally changed my life. One of the first exercises they had me do was a steering exercise in the paddock and when they asked me how to steer the bike I didn't have an answer, I just sort of leaned and kinda said, I just make it turn....and that was the beginning of my understanding that I didn't know Sh*T about riding.

After taking the first two levels of the school I was an entirely changed rider but it took a lot of extra time and effort to UNLEARN all the bad habits that I had formed over the years.

Long story short I guess, if I had gone to an advanced riding school sooner I could have prevented some of those race/street crashes and would have been a better, safer rider sooner.

Here is a link to an article I wrote on attending track days before advanced riding schools, might explain my thoughts a little better.

School or Track Day?
 
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