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When you go to a track, what techniques do you focus on first? How do you decide what to work on first and where to put your attention and focus? How does that change from practice to when the flag drops and the race starts?
Line selection, braking points, throttle control.
Focus is on consistency and error correction.
Nothing changes when the flag drops. Unfortunately, I don't miraculously become faster when it's a race.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Line selection, braking points, throttle control.
Focus is on consistency and error correction.
Nothing changes when the flag drops. Unfortunately, I don't miraculously become faster when it's a race.
Do you ever draw the track? I find that helps tremendously with remembering points and solidifying on track reference points.

Most of us don't get miraculously faster when racing, you put in the work during practice and when the flag drops it's time to ride. Sometimes that can be enough to push you up to 100% if you were riding 95% in practice/qualifying which is why some people can go faster, but it mostly due to the time they put in before hand, on improving skills. My experience with it anyway :grin::grin:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
On practice I mostly put attention on lines and body position.
Good things to focus on! What things do you work on when you put attention on Lines? Are you trying to be more consistent, use more of the track, practice different lines? What about BP? Trying to get lower, more stable with your lower body, hang off more? What is your focus there?

On the race I just try be fast as possible and relax.
Love this! Fast as possible while being relaxed- Perfect for racing :grin::grin:
 

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Sergejs Kravcenko started in 2014 No Limits and 2015 continued, then ThundersportGB 2016, BSB Supersport under #23 wildcard entries 2017 and 2018.
I would say the most important target is not to rush. Being smooth is the key factory element being very fast on track, as when you are smooth you are making less mistakes and more concetrated on lines and piloting the bike. Once you start rushing like trying to follow the guy, who overtook you there starts lots of issues and problems and very likely will lead to a crash. For me personally I identify what sectors I'll be concentrating on and will ignore the general lap time. just going sector by sector and literally just practicing this particular corner or two. Then next session you choose the other one and so on, final two sessions I tend to just relax and ride as I love and enjoy, and lap times become consistent and you become faster and faster.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Sergejs Kravcenko started in 2014 No Limits and 2015 continued, then ThundersportGB 2016, BSB Supersport under #23 wildcard entries 2017 and 2018.
I would say the most important target is not to rush. Being smooth is the key factory element being very fast on track, as when you are smooth you are making less mistakes and more concetrated on lines and piloting the bike. Once you start rushing like trying to follow the guy, who overtook you there starts lots of issues and problems and very likely will lead to a crash. For me personally I identify what sectors I'll be concentrating on and will ignore the general lap time. just going sector by sector and literally just practicing this particular corner or two. Then next session you choose the other one and so on, final two sessions I tend to just relax and ride as I love and enjoy, and lap times become consistent and you become faster and faster.
Love that you mention going sector by sector or even corner by corner when you are working on improving lap times. When I was racing AMA, Keith Code was coaching me and would make me draw the track from my own memory and then we would compare my map to my split time and every single time my worst section corresponded with the section on my map that had the fewest specific reference points. So I would then go out and focus on finding more RP's, solidifying my lines and then times would improve!

Smooth is fast and putting in specific and measurable focussed work before the race makes a huge huge difference :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I would say the most important target is not to rush. Being smooth is the key factory element being very fast on track said:
So here is a question. What makes a rider smooth? Can you be fast but not smooth? Can you be slow but smooth? How do you achieve being fast AND smooth?
 

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So here is a question. What makes a rider smooth? Can you be fast but not smooth? Can you be slow but smooth? How do you achieve being fast AND smooth?
I will have a go.

Assuming the rider knowing all the right things about riding on a track re bike setup, positioning and rider input.

I would say the key is having the situational awareness to know where you are and where you will be in the future on the track and what you need to do when you get there. That is where RPs come in. It gets you in front of the bike so things appear slower/or you feel like you have more time.

But, looking at your resume I'm tipping you already know that.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Just curious. You was taught by Keith Code himself, was just wondering.
Sure I was lucky enough to learn a lot of my riding/racing techniques from Keith Code himself. However, I only started riding motorcycles at at the age of 24 and was 31 when I decided to try my hand at AMA Roadracing after only a few years of racing experience. Plus, being a privateer trying to be competitive against factory AMA pro riders is a huge hurdle as well! We have some pretty amazing stories from our AMA days, and I'm very grateful for the experience. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I will have a go.

Assuming the rider knowing all the right things about riding on a track re bike setup, positioning and rider input.

I would say the key is having the situational awareness to know where you are and where you will be in the future on the track and what you need to do when you get there. That is where RPs come in. It gets you in front of the bike so things appear slower/or you feel like you have more time.

But, looking at your resume I'm tipping you already know that.
ahhhhh, love this!! "to know where you are and where you will be in the future on the track AND what you need to do when you get there." This is awesome. We actually use this idea in our reference points seminar, the idea of how cool it would be to know exactly where you are and where you are going on track all the time. Having enough solid RP's to lead you from place to place (almost like a connect the dots picture) allows your perception of speed to slow down. Well explained.

I'd say that is a factor in creating a smooth rider, but could you have a rider that knew exactly where he wanted to be and go on the track but still ride ragged, hectic and very much NOT smooth? What else needs to go along with RP's and visual skills to facilitate smooth riding. Can you have one without the other?
 
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