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Has anyone done one? On my R6 2000 Model its looking faded and looking brittle and i have a new one to put one but have a question!

Can i some how change it without having to bleed the fluid?

Cheers.
 

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UR B-hind Da 8 Ball
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As long as you leave fluid in the hose between the mc and the reservoir, so the master cylinder doesn’t get air in it, you won’t need to bleed the system. Although bleeding the system periodically is a good idea.
 

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You use the rear brake?

:wink:

Some people leave air in the rear brake line to ensure that they don't lock it up in a panic situation. If the res looks brittle and faded and is a sign of distant past maintenance, I'd get a couple bottles of brake fluid and flush front and back.
I mean, it's your brakes.
 

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If your changing the res because it’s too old, you definitely need to flush the fluid. ...........................
.............If the res[ervoir] looks brittle and faded and is a sign of distant past maintenance................
Regular, direct sun exposure, actually; both the fading and the cracks from a combination of the plastics degrading and thermal expansion/contraction.


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BTW, avoid letting hot water touch any rubber. It will irrecoverably stretch the rubber topper used in that reservoir. Fortunately I had an extra.

Replaced cracked front master cylinder and bled the replacement quite a bit too well. (used velcro strap to force the lever while I cracked the bleed screws) The lines are under so much pressure now, that the front wheel is a little hard to roll by hand and touching the lever begins to significantly slow the bike, before the brake switch is engaged to light up the rear. I'll have to go back and release some pressure from the system. I may be able to use paper or business cards as a spacer between pad and rotor.

As implied by others, unless you're a 300 pounder, the rear won't handle a lot before sliding. I've used more rear than normal (not to the point of sliding) to help balance out some of the tire wear... and also because I thought it would create less wear on the front pads. But I've seen now that the front pads last forever anyway so no point. The manual tells you to use some rear, but using more than designed/intended eats the pads for lunch. But they're cheap and quick/easy to swap. If you're not using organic pads for the rear, using too much rear will also chew through your rotor, necessitating early replacement. (and that isn't cheap or quick)

The forward most pad carrier for the rear caliper can also get damaged/worn/indented, keeping the pad from backing off like it should. That pad carrier is apart of the bracket support. (#10)
https://www.ronayers.com/oemparts/a/yam/50046a16f8700209bc79671f/rear-brake-caliper
Good to take a peek at that when doing a pad/rotor/caliper service.
 

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Also avoid overfilling that reservoir. As the braking system heats up, the parts and liquid will expand. If it's overfilled, it will slowly lockup your brakes.
 

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Personally, I would probably do a quick bleed along with it, just for the hell of it.
reread my post. Even if you had coffee colored fluid in the system... there is enough hydraulic pressure to lock the rear brake up.
Go to any motorcycle junkyard with a sealed brake system... still works.
 

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Yeah, you can afford to "learn" with the rear brake. It's the front you absolutely don't want to futz up.

One more thing, that outer and inner mounting bolt for the rear caliper loves to seize when improperly torqued. The metal is *very* soft and will strip faster than the President standing before Stormy. Be sure to use some good anti-seize during reassembly.
 
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