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Discussion Starter #1
I know that platics are definately recommended and probably racing tires for optimum stickiness......but what else?

Is a steering damper needed? How about the brakes? Will the stock brakes be good enough for a beginner to come to a halt? Its my first track session so I don't expect to go out and be Rossi.......yet. . . .:D
 

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Intermediate Knee Dragger
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Nothing extra is really needed for your first time.

The brakes will be perfectly adequate.

A damper might be nice, but it's not really a necessity for your first time out.

Race tires will be a complete waste in the Novice Group. Seriously. The newer sport-touring tires are adequate, though I recommend regular sport tires. I know guys in the Advanced Group running regular Pilot Powers and running at least 10 seconds per lap faster than me.

Race bodywork is nice if you're going to crash, but that really doesn't happen in the Novice Group very often. For my first track day, I was too nervous to really push my limits very far, mostly because it was raining, but also because I'm a wimp and the thought of crashing isn't pleasant. I've been doing a few track days per year since 05 and I just bought my first set of race bodywork last week.

The only thing I would really highly recommend would be getting your suspension setup properly. That will be more beneficial than any shiny trinkets.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Nothing extra is really needed for your first time.

The brakes will be perfectly adequate.

A damper might be nice, but it's not really a necessity for your first time out.

Race tires will be a complete waste in the Novice Group. Seriously. The newer sport-touring tires are adequate, though I recommend regular sport tires. I know guys in the Advanced Group running regular Pilot Powers and running at least 10 seconds per lap faster than me.

Race bodywork is nice if you're going to crash, but that really doesn't happen in the Novice Group very often. For my first track day, I was too nervous to really push my limits very far, mostly because it was raining, but also because I'm a wimp and the thought of crashing isn't pleasant. I've been doing a few track days per year since 05 and I just bought my first set of race bodywork last week.

The only thing I would really highly recommend would be getting your suspension setup properly. That will be more beneficial than any shiny trinkets.
Ok....Got it! Thanks for responding!

Did you have any problem installing your plastics? I want 2 do as much of the work myself as possible and was curious if you had any problems lining things up......I know they come 'predrilled' but that doesn't always means its right...
 

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Intermediate Knee Dragger
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I bought a used set, so alignment was the last guy's problem...

And I haven't installed them yet. They're still in the box.
 

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plastics aren't necessary, but are nice. Stock brakes will be fine as long as there's meat left on the pad. I would suggest flushing your brake fluid though if it hasn't been done in the last year. Any street tire will work fine (pilot power, supercorsa, bt0016, etc). Your first time at the track really doesn't require much be done to the bike. You're first time at the track as a rider will be totally different than as a spectator though, so I suggest you find someone thats done at least 3 or 4 trackdays and go to the track with them. This way you'll have someone who is versed in registration, tech inspection, etc and the whole process will go smoother for you.

Also, someone mentioned either here or the other thread, but being as your a girl and are probably light for the stock suspension, I would ask the track club beforehand if a suspension guy will be there, and pay the 30-40 dollars to have it setup. Proper sag and rebound will make the biggest difference to the bike.
 

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Depending on riding style and experience a steering damper might be worth it. If your going to be at Lightning at NJMP there is a blind turn (turn 1) that has a hill on corner exit. I know that i was getting headshake coming over the crest hard on the gas... and that was with a steering damper (on the lowest setting). So it might be a nice piece of mind, but def not a must. As far as tires, I used Pirelli Diablo Corsa III's there and put two track days on them and they performed beautifully. So i would recomend them. Im bumping up in classes so i'm making the jump to race rubber, so we'll see how that goes.

But if it comes down to money for tires, or money for a damper... I would get a set of DCIII's or equivalent before a damper. Best of luck... and be careful... track days are addicting!
 

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oh.... and stainless lines make a huge help... and are fairly cheap, but sportbike brakes even in stock form are pretty mind blowing that the average rider (myself included) will probably have a hard time ever seeing the limit of them.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
THANKS YZRM1-R6! I was wondering about the brake lines.....Based on everyone's recomendations, looks like I can concentrate on getting the right gear and then worry about mods later (next summer, or maybe even the next).

I've decided to take everyone's advice and definately take the riding class....I'm so EXCITED!!! I've been on YouTube watching a gazillion videos!!! I have the Lightening Track at Thunderbolt memorized...turn by turn......I CAN"T WAIT!!!!!!!

Yah, I know.....I'm giddy.....so WHAT!! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
plastics aren't necessary, but are nice. Stock brakes will be fine as long as there's meat left on the pad. I would suggest flushing your brake fluid though if it hasn't been done in the last year. Any street tire will work fine (pilot power, supercorsa, bt0016, etc). Your first time at the track really doesn't require much be done to the bike. You're first time at the track as a rider will be totally different than as a spectator though, so I suggest you find someone thats done at least 3 or 4 trackdays and go to the track with them. This way you'll have someone who is versed in registration, tech inspection, etc and the whole process will go smoother for you.

Also, someone mentioned either here or the other thread, but being as your a girl and are probably light for the stock suspension, I would ask the track club beforehand if a suspension guy will be there, and pay the 30-40 dollars to have it setup. Proper sag and rebound will make the biggest difference to the bike.

THANKS MAN!! I'll make sure I look for the suspension guy! I bet having the right set up does makes it that much nicer....
 

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and whatever tire you are using call the manufacturer and ask for the recommended pressure for track use...and make sure you check it every time you come off the track and keep it within 10% of where u started
 

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You don't need anything done to your bike for your first track day. Nothing.. Check your tire PSI and learn how to ride on the track thats all. Experience, experience, is all you need.
 

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i dont know about nothing....no extras maybe. also something to think about is safety wiring your oil drain and filter. i know its not required but if something happens and you oil down the track most organizers will kick you out and everyone will hate you for ruining an hour of their track day :p accurate tire pressure, a drill, and some safety wire....cheap insurance for a good day at the track
 

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and whatever tire you are using call the manufacturer and ask for the recommended pressure for track use...and make sure you check it every time you come off the track and keep it within 10% of where u started
Umm, no. Tire recommendations from manufacturers will always be given as cold tire pressure. Hot tire pressure is normally 3-4 psi above their recommendation (on some tires this is almost 20%), and should only be adjusted after looking at the temperature profile and wear patterns on the tire.
 

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uhh yea..because you always set your initial pressure when the tire is cold. or has every tire guy (including tech support at Pirelli USA) at every track ive ever been to been wrong. 90% of tires are in the 30 psi range (some of the michelins like really low pressures like 24 or somethin) on the track so 3psi would be.....tada 10%.....right where a hot tire pressure should be in relation to the cold pressure
 

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uhh yea..because you always set your initial pressure when the tire is cold. or has every tire guy (including tech support at Pirelli USA) at every track ive ever been to been wrong. 90% of tires are in the 30 psi range (some of the michelins like really low pressures like 24 or somethin) on the track so 3psi would be.....tada 10%.....right where a hot tire pressure should be in relation to the cold pressure
Michelin Power race 180 cold pressure 24 psi.
Michelin Power race 180 hot pressure 28 psi.
Percent difference: 14.3 %

Once you set a cold pressure, it shouldn't be adjusted hot unless the tire is doing something you don't want it to do. Be it non-optimum temperature profile across the tire (hot spots for example), or if the tire is slipping and you want to try to get a bit more traction out of it. Also, these adjustments should never be more than 1/2 psi at a time or you risk having the characteristics of the tire change dramatically and in uncontrollable ways for the average rider.
 

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didnt i post that some of the michelins were different? and i doubt they are running a DOT race tire their first time out. o and the set it and leave it theory...that goes against everything anyone ive talked to about tires has ever said...and since ive never had a tire presuure related crash ill stick to the 10% theory
 

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