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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

am new here and would greatly appreciate some help with a question that I am sure has been asked numerous times before:

(i) i am a lower intermediate level rider, not very fast at all. Want to buy slicks as a one off to help cope with fears involving certain cornering drills (just helps if i know there is more rubber than i could possibly need at my level). I have all the tyre warmers etc but would be grateful for advice on which tyres to get:

- should i get the dunlop kr106/108 tyres (rear profile is 185/65/17 which is not the same as the standard);

- or do i get the pirelli supercorsa SC (currently running SP's) - these are available to me in the 180/55 size).

would the higher height of the dunlops make any difference? i do not have access to people well versed in the art of tuning suspensions to make up for the added mm in height that the dunlops will give me.

(ii) does anyone know of a supplier that will ship slicks / pirellis out to the UAE?

Thanks very much!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
ps - sorry i meant to ask if there will be a noticeable difference between the SC's and the slicks (and the SC's and the SP's for that matter).
 

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There is zero difference in traction between a SC DOT, and a SC slick (assuming they are the same compounds). If you don't have any complains with the SP's, stick with them. The SC's are a huge price jump.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
cheers both.

High Side, yes, painfully aware of how expensive the SC is in comparison. But understand that slicks are no cheaper? Am justifying this as a one time spend to get my confidence levels up and then can hopefully resume riding on the SP's.
 

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cheers both.

High Side, yes, painfully aware of how expensive the SC is in comparison. But understand that slicks are no cheaper? Am justifying this as a one time spend to get my confidence levels up and then can hopefully resume riding on the SP's.
If you don't have the pace to utilize the extra grip race tires offer, you are only wasting your money. If you have no traction issues with the SP's, stick with them.

Upgrading tires is a double edged sword. Everybody loves the confidence they'll inspire, and you'll know you'll be able to run a quick pace running them. However, if you're a lower-intermediate rider (as you said yourself), they will cover up a lot of your riding mistakes with the extra grip they have. So maybe in a scenario where you might have tucked the front with a SP, you wouldn't notice it as much (if at all) with a SC.

That being said, there are a lot of slower riders that run race tires and still crash all the time. Grippy tires are not the answer to solving the lack of riding technique. There is a certain pace where you can over heat street tires on the track. They'll start to get greasy and slide around on you a bit...so at that point, yeah, it's time to upgrade.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
im just trying to learn how to drop upper body down and take corners at a faster pace and its bl**dy scary! keep thinking the wheels will slip.

i was previously hanging off more with my lower body - as in i was coaxing my knee to the tarmac, upper body over the side of the tank but still pretty upright.

fixing this issue is ...umm... tricky!
 

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im just trying to learn how to drop upper body down and take corners at a faster pace and its bl**dy scary! keep thinking the wheels will slip.

i was previously hanging off more with my lower body - as in i was coaxing my knee to the tarmac, upper body over the side of the tank but still pretty upright.

fixing this issue is ...umm... tricky!
Sounds to me like you need to work on getting more seat time (getting more comfortable on the bike) and some riding lessons from a reputable riding school (YCRS, Keith Code, etc). The best tires in the world won't help you with your body positioning and being comfortable on the bike.
 

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If you don't have the pace to utilize the extra grip race tires offer, you are only wasting your money. If you have no traction issues with the SP's, stick with them.

Upgrading tires is a double edged sword. Everybody loves the confidence they'll inspire, and you'll know you'll be able to run a quick pace running them. However, if you're a lower-intermediate rider (as you said yourself), they will cover up a lot of your riding mistakes with the extra grip they have. So maybe in a scenario where you might have tucked the front with a SP, you wouldn't notice it as much (if at all) with a SC.

That being said, there are a lot of slower riders that run race tires and still crash all the time. Grippy tires are not the answer to solving the lack of riding technique. There is a certain pace where you can over heat street tires on the track. They'll start to get greasy and slide around on you a bit...so at that point, yeah, it's time to upgrade.
+1 to all of this. It's pretty much exactly what I was going to write after reading your first post.

I would also add that if carrying more corner speed feels scary, the thing you probably need to work on is vision, and not body position.

As long as you're not death-gripping the bars or way way crossed up, at your pace, having perfect body position stuff isn't going to make a huge difference. Everybody wants to drag a knee, and it's a great feeling when you do, but going out with as the goal, and riding around trying to stick your knee out as far as possible is going to result in slow lap times and a lot of crashing.

Go out, and focus on getting your vision farther up the track. Make sure you have reference points for braking, apex and exit on every turn. Then focus on moving your vision to the next reference point long before you physically reach your 'current' reference point. It'll help A LOT with that sensation of speed, and the pavement going by faster than you're comfortable with.

You'll make way better progress working on your vision, and rolling on the gas smoothly as soon as possible, than focusing on lean angle and knee dragging. And those last two will sneak right up on you if you get good at the first two things.

:cheers
 
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