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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone. Just joined.
I ride an S1000rr. But, I race an R6. Don`t hate me.

I picked up an 04 R6 racebike, which is track ready, steering damper, 520 chain conversion, 200 rear, etc. Its great.

The only thing is, the previous owner put the stock clutch back in, because he sold the slipper.

Slipper vs non-slipper? I know a slipper is safer. I have a decent skill level, so I`m thinking I should be alright without the slipper.

I am trying to keep my costs in check as my banker/partner isn`t impressed with racing thing already...

Opinions?
 

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I mean, do you want to win? :laugh Tell her that the money spent is more wasted when you get beat because your back tire is trying to do its best impression of Michael J. Fox writing his name at every corner entrance that requires braking and downshifting...:laugh
 

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Win? Not sure thats happening for me just yet.... This is my first year racing.
So you'll be in novice where everyone has more bike than skill.... :YEA
 

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Meh
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I race an '05 with no slipper and it's manageable. If you're just getting into racing, and you're not knocking out lap times that'll put you on the podium, it'll be fine.

If anything, I think it's a good learning tool, as it really teaches you to be slow and smooth with your clutch release, and keep your body relaxed when the rear starts moving around a little on corner entrance.

When your pace is such that the thing is wagging it's tail back and forth on every corner entrance, you can suck it up and put a slipper clutch in, or make the jump to a 3rd gen bike. Or just back it into every corner like a boss. ;)
 

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nova r6
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I race an '05 with no slipper and it's manageable. If you're just getting into racing, and you're not knocking out lap times that'll put you on the podium, it'll be fine.

If anything, I think it's a good learning tool, as it really teaches you to be slow and smooth with your clutch release, and keep your body relaxed when the rear starts moving around a little on corner entrance.

When your pace is such that the thing is wagging it's tail back and forth on every corner entrance, you can suck it up and put a slipper clutch in, or make the jump to a 3rd gen bike. Or just back it into every corner like a boss. ;)

I agree, however after putting the slipper in my 05 I dont think I could live without it.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Me like to be the boss........ Bwahahaha!!!

Thanks for the advice. I`ll see what happens after some decent seat time.





I race an '05 with no slipper and it's manageable. If you're just getting into racing, and you're not knocking out lap times that'll put you on the podium, it'll be fine.

If anything, I think it's a good learning tool, as it really teaches you to be slow and smooth with your clutch release, and keep your body relaxed when the rear starts moving around a little on corner entrance.

When your pace is such that the thing is wagging it's tail back and forth on every corner entrance, you can suck it up and put a slipper clutch in, or make the jump to a 3rd gen bike. Or just back it into every corner like a boss. ;)
 

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Reads the rulez
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Reads the rulez
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That's nice dear...


In all seriousness, I was just a bit taken back because I don't see too many running that size out here; especially on an 04 with the smaller front tire.
Until this year, the 200 was the only size Pirelli made a slick in. Moto America is running the Dunlop 200 rear on the supersport classes this year, and Dunlop makes both a 190 and 200. I don't know of anyone that still uses the smaller OEM specified size up front on the older sport bikes. Everyone I know (and did myself years ago) was just put a 120/70 on it and rode it. I couldn't notice a damn bit of difference, but that was back in the days of just street riding so it wouldn't be as big of a deal.

Fender clearance...minor problem. ;)
 

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Or you could learn to rev-match your downshifts. It seems like a lot of people use the slipper clutch as a bandaid to mask what they can simply do with their right hand and a little practice.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Or you could learn to rev-match your downshifts. It seems like a lot of people use the slipper clutch as a bandaid to mask what they can simply do with their right hand and a little practice.
THat`s what I think as well.

I think of the slipper as something of a back up in case I f-up my rev matching.....
 

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Or think of it as something that allows you to not focus on rev-matching and focus on other things like hitting your reference points and so on. People used to ride horses before there were cars, but does anyone advocate for the stagecoach as a viable means of transportation of people and goods anymore? Remember when telephones were attached to the wall? :laugh
 

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Anyone know if a 3rd generation slipper will fit into a 2nd generation engine/clutch cover?
 

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Or think of it as something that allows you to not focus on rev-matching and focus on other things like hitting your reference points and so on. People used to ride horses before there were cars, but does anyone advocate for the stagecoach as a viable means of transportation of people and goods anymore? Remember when telephones were attached to the wall? :laugh
If you need to "focus" on rev matching then you need to practice it more. Even with a -1/+4 setup and shifting all day throughout the gears at my local tracks, I have never lost my braking or turn in points because of it. If you practice it enough then it becomes second nature; I don't even think about it anymore.

In fact I would argue just the opposite; the chassis stays straight and controlled when you rev-match. It's not fighting the force of the rear wheel trying to match the engine speed, causing the rear to hop around if you're really digging in to the apex hard. To me, that makes it more difficult to focus on reference points with a chassis that isn't stabilized.

Edit: When it comes down to it though, whatever makes you feel comfortable and safe is the best option. If it's using the slipper clutch then so be it, but my lap times aren't hurting from doing it the "old school" way.
 
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