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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm sitting here working, bored off my ass, and I figured I would query about something that I've been doing a lot lately.

Here for the past couple of months when I come up to a stop sign or stop light, I have been using both brakes as usual, but for some reason I have been sliding my back tire. It's not for very long at all, under or around a foot, and at this point I'm starting to get used to it but it's still startling sometimes.

So I guess my question is do any of you guys do this on a regular basis when you stop or do I need to let up on the foot? Maybe it's a fear of doing a failed stoppie?
 

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www.1seven1.com
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You may actually be using the front brake more as you get more experience (lightening the rear wheel and giving you less traction).

I don't use the rear brake that much unless I'm riding two-up, doing u-turns or off in the kibble. As I've been back riding more dirt this summer, I'm trying to translate my off-road rear brake use to my track/racing skills. It's not easy (for me, anyway)

-D
 

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GSXR Eater
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yes man ur too heavy on ur rear break. ease up on it a bit.go with 70% front break 30% rear break.i hardly ever use my rear break.
 

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190rwhp......:eek5
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Only time I ever use my rear brake is under severe braking...yellow turned millesecond before the "punch it" or "brake" point...or if wanting to be first at the metering light for an on-ramp...but theres been a couple of times where Ive accidently locked it up going hot into a turn...wakes ya up, but dirt riding plays a big role in prevention of a high side in that scenero...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Alright, I figured I was being too heavy on it. I'll try to get used to being on the front brake harder. It is helping me get better with my balance though, heh.
 

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crashing aint so bad
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The rear brake has some uses but stopping usually isn't usually one of them, unless you are in the tullies. The rear brake is good for tightening a line up mid turn if the occasion really calls for it. Or if say you are going over a hill at a high speed while turning and want to keep positive front end traction. otherwise it can create more problems than it solves. And even when you do use it it must be with great discretion. The rear tire will come up a lot when you really get a good pace going and late braking is part of your riding style. I have had the rear come up many a time before going into a turn. not a fun experience when you also have the rear brake engaged and the rear wheel is locking.
 

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my new habit
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check your tire pressure too...its getting colder here in the midwest and i checked mine the other day and it was 10lbs too low that might give u the sensation of the tire sliding
 

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The harder you get on your front brakes, the more you have to ease up on your rear brake.

The weight is getting transfered to the front of the bike, giving the rear less traction.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The rear brake has some uses but stopping usually isn't usually one of them, unless you are in the tullies. The rear brake is good for tightening a line up mid turn if the occasion really calls for it. Or if say you are going over a hill at a high speed while turning and want to keep positive front end traction. otherwise it can create more problems than it solves. And even when you do use it it must be with great discretion. The rear tire will come up a lot when you really get a good pace going and late braking is part of your riding style. I have had the rear come up many a time before going into a turn. not a fun experience when you also have the rear brake engaged and the rear wheel is locking.
That was probably one of the most helpful replies I have seen since I signed up. All the reading I've done and videos I have watched you would think someone would have said that. One question though...tullies?
 

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i'm assuming he means off-track. also, are u in gear until ur completely stopped? if ur pulling in the clutch and coasting to a stop, there's ur problem. being in gear allows ur motor to keep pushing that wheel forward instead of locking up.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Yes, I am actually guilty of pulling in my clutch. Probably 10-15 feet before a light or stop sign, I pull it in, when I hit about 10 mph I click down the rest of my gears. When I try to come to a stop without pulling it in, especially if it's an emergency stop, the chain starts clicking and making crazy noises.

I've been driving my car long enough that we're basically melded together and I can come to a light with no problems and not have to push in the clutch until I'm basically stopped. On the bike though it feels like it wants to die much sooner.

Also, I was blipping the throttle and downshifting like in my car but I read so many things about it wearing down your gears and motor faster. Is this something I can keep doing? It made it much more comfortable to come to a stop without pulling the clutch in.
 

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I'm going to start off by saying I'm new to street but a dirt vet. I realized very quickly that some of my dirt habits weren't going to work for street. On a dirt bike you use or front brake for dumping speed and your rear for steering. If I'm coming in hot on dirt the first thing I do is pull in the clutch because I know I'm going to lock the rear tire.

On the street your tires should never be slipping and you don't have berms to bounce off of.

I've taught myself to just leave the rear brake alone. I basically don't use it because I know I don't have the proper control and feel. I do experiment with the back brake during planned safe situations. I've bee told by vet. street riders at under normal and emergency conditions you aren't going to induce a endo with the front brake without trying. You are more likely to lock the front tire. The modern sport bike is designed to prevent lifting the rear tire.

I suggest trying some emergency braking (under safe conditions of course). This helps build confidence in how much you can brake. I haven't been able to lift the rear tire without trying (sitting up and quickly shifting your weight forward)

In short don't feel like because your told 70/30 you have you use the back brake. I think the situations where the back brake will save you are few for a novice rider on the street. The likely hood of it causing grave problems is much greater than it saving you.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Well, I paid attention to what I was doing for a couple of days and I figured out that for some reason, right before I'm about to stop, I'm talking a couple of seconds, I press down more on the back brake. I have no idea why, but now I can stop doing it.

I'll still try to ease up on the rear brake though, I'm pretty sure after reading all you guys' responses that I'm using too much.
 

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dude.. don't even touch it, especially if your clutch is pulled in until you've got the control to use it correctly.. If you lock the rear tire while the bike is crossed up your DUN
 

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Chicken Strips Sold Out
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You can always adjust the rear brake so you don't brake so hard also.
It would bring the pedal down more so it would also be easier for you to balance the wheelie too if you are that type of person.
:)
 

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crashing aint so bad
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I would exercise for the sake of safety not using the rear brake anytime that the clutch lever is pulled in. I to also go through the last 2-3 gears when coming to a stop while the clutch is pulled in. I also don't use the rear brake while stopping. Tullies is to be known as bum ****ed eqypt, no mans land, or anywhere else you don't want your bike to be that happens to be in the dirt, gravel, or any other traction reducing material. useing the front brake in any such material will certainly end with drab results. However useing the rear brake in such situations will increase the likleyhood of a recovery.
 

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I just got my "sport bike riding techniques" book I bought off of amazon after my uncle (long time sport rider) insisted I read it. I'm a long time rider of dirt and snow and I've had lots of technique questions to try to shorted my learning curve and try my best not to learn the hard way. After reading the braking chapter I feel I could have give much better advise than before and I have many concepts to try my next time out. I'll list a few ideas..

- Rig your rear brake lever lower so you have to extend your foot to near its natural limit as you fully depress the lever
- Rig the caliper so the pads contact less of the rotor; lessening the efficiency for the brake.
- Remove material from the pads by machining away pad material.

A great point I read.

If your riding along at 50 and lightly press the rear brake what happens? The rear end settles.

If your riding along and pull in the front brake what happens? The weight transfers forward and the rear end becomes lighter. (making rear braking more touchy)

If you lightly press your rear brake just before applying your front brake the rear tends to stay more settled.

I can't wait to try it!! The book is great to read and I'm going to make a list of things to try and put in my tank bag map sleeve.
 

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crashing aint so bad
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There are to many variables with the rear brake. If you are using it and then apply front brake the amount of breaking applied to the rear rotor is more effective, increasing the likleyhood of the rear tire locking up. If there is one place on a bike to have ABS it is the rear tire. As mentioned not always bad mid turn or while initiating a turn but always with the utmost discretion. basically don't touch it unless you absolutly have to, and if so, only with great care.
 
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