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Zip ties and Duct tape
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So I screwed up... i was trying to adjust my chain and i accidentally stripped out the adjusting bolt. How easy of a fix is this? The bolt itself is loose, i just cant tighten it back up since its stripped. I believe i ordered the correct parts, do I need to order new axle blocks? I'm gonna replace both bolts on either side since the other is starting to round a bit too. I'm kind of a noob with wrenching on bikes so I might take the bike to the shop and just have them install it. Just wanna know how much labor time i can expect they would charge for installing these? Also, how do you get the block to stay in place while you tighten up the lock nuts when you are adjusting? Thanks.

I ordered parts 23 and 24, 2 of each
 

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Probably an hour's worth of shop labor; whatever that is; simply because that's a minimum of what they "can" charge. The shop will of course find other things that should or need to be done.
 

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Why yes I don't!!!!!!!!!!
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no... do not bring to a shop. Guarantee they charge more than an hour and they wont install your parts.

First you need a 12mm for the tension nut
4mm allen for the adjuster.


Buy a box end like this... https://www.ebay.com/itm/Gearwrench-Stubby-Ratcheting-Wrench-Any-Size-SAE-or-Metric-Combination-Ratchet/292322066278?hash=item440fc0bf66:m:mDHse8JsApXTcwvq0_GDSCw:sc:USPSFirstClass!32246!US!-1

Get an 8, 10, 12, & 14 size while youre at it.
Then a T handle allen metric set. All in probably less than $30 in tools

To change out those adjuster bolts... you have to remove the axle. And when you reassemble... put some waterproof grease inside the threads to keep them from seizing
 

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no... do not bring to a shop. Guarantee they charge more than an hour and they wont install your parts.

First you need a 12mm for the tension nut
4mm allen for the adjuster.


Buy a box end like this... https://www.ebay.com/itm/Gearwrench-Stubby-Ratcheting-Wrench-Any-Size-SAE-or-Metric-Combination-Ratchet/292322066278?hash=item440fc0bf66:m:mDHse8JsApXTcwvq0_GDSCw:sc:USPSFirstClass!32246!US!-1

Get an 8, 10, 12, & 14 size while youre at it.
Then a T handle allen metric set. All in probably less than $30 in tools

To change out those adjuster bolts... you have to remove the axle. And when you reassemble... put some waterproof grease inside the threads to keep them from seizing
gearwrench sucks. the tolerance in the open ends are too big. I bought a set from sears when it was closing a local store. I used the 12mm once and I could see it starting to round off the nut. I got my professional craftsman wrench out (yes they made pro grade tools that they didn't sell at sears stores on the floor) and got it loose with it.
the gearwrench stuff doesn't fit snugly on anything.
 

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Why yes I don't!!!!!!!!!!
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gearwrench sucks. the tolerance in the open ends are too big. I bought a set from sears when it was closing a local store. I used the 12mm once and I could see it starting to round off the nut. I got my professional craftsman wrench out (yes they made pro grade tools that they didn't sell at sears stores on the floor) and got it loose with it.
the gearwrench stuff doesn't fit snugly on anything.
GTFO out with that shit. Hilarious on many accounts.
NAPA covers them with a lifetime exchange warranty. Crapsman is distributed by lowes
 

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A simple tip to avoid this in future is to turn bolts anti clockwise (assuming standard right hand thread) with a driver (not your fingers) until you feel a click. This is the sound/feel of the starting threads matching up. Then turn it clockwise to tighten. If you are not sure turn it anti clockwise again until you feel it again. And clean the threads or even re thread the bolts with a die or run the correct size tap in holes before re installing especially if Loctite is used. AND never rush. Pros can but they wrench all the time. Always do your maintenance with plenty of time.

99% of the time this will avoid cross threading. One caveat is dirty threads from general grime, corrosion or old Loctite. This interferes with the thread leading to people not threading straight and pushing through signs that are cross threading because they are used to pushing through dirty threads (whether they know it or not). Often you can easily save a cross thread if you stop early enough. Then it merely requires a quick tap to tidy up the starting threads as they are usually the easiest bits damaged. Pushing through that creates the more permanent drama where re tapping, heli coils or welding and starting again are required.

Buy a tap and die set also. Saves you a fortune on old and poorly maintained bikes.
 

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YC - I suspect you got Craftsmen and GearWrench mixed up. Craftsmen (Sears) does have loose fitment. If the fastener isn't seized or the torque requirement near or above part spec then you can get away with them... usually.

I absolutely HATE that 12-point socket non-sense.
 

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A simple tip to avoid this in future is to turn bolts anti clockwise (assuming standard right hand thread) with a driver (not your fingers) until you feel a click. This is the sound/feel of the starting threads matching up. Then turn it clockwise to tighten. If you are not sure turn it anti clockwise again until you feel it again.
I used to be absolutely terrible at cross-threading until I figured that out for myself. It's a great tip to pass on... and I occasionally do also.



And clean the threads or even re thread the bolts with a die or run the correct size tap in holes before re installing ..................................................
This I absolutely avoid doing unless the threads are damaged. (in which case, a re-tap likely won't hold the required torque) For me at least, the debris invariably results with tap seizing, then cross-threading. Even when it didn't end in a total disaster, some thread material still got needlessly removed. (so - pretty much always results with holding less torque)


Instead, what I do is use a steel wire pipe cleaning brush. For example, a prior automobile's spark plugs had anti-seize on them. I'd always blow out the wells with 150 PSI compressed air *before* removing the spark plugs, but over the decades, sediment still managed to get trapped in the threads. I had one particular cylinder that just required too much torque to be comfortable. The other cylinders had some resistance, but nothing like this one. Got an idea! Went to Lowes, got a few diameter sizes of steel wire pipe cleaner brushes; maybe 1/2", 3/4", 1". Cylinder three not being at TDC, rammed the brush straight down the hole, then proceeded to back it out, by turning it counter-clockwise. It was so difficult to turn (because of the intentionally oversized diameter) that I had use pliers to turn it. By the time I was done, I could screw that spark plug in by hand as if the 20+ year old head were brand new.



BTW, I also hacksaw the handles off of these, put them into a drill, and use them to cleanup battery clamps and terminals. I also put them into high speed A/C plug-in drills and use them to hone out caliper slide mounts. Everybody I consulted kept telling to replace my calipers because the caliper slide mounts chronically locked up. Honing them out with these steel wire pipe cleaner brushes was a permanent solution to the chronic issue... and I didn't have to replace my OEM calipers with aftermarket JUNK.
 

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Why yes I don't!!!!!!!!!!
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in no instance should locktite or any thread locker be used on the axle adjuster bolts.
also I was always told to NEVER put a tool on newly installed fastener since it removes the "feel" of threads engaging.
The gearwrench I linked is perfect for the task of adjusting axle tension. Makes a mundane tedious task a breeze. Especially with nylocks. The tool allows you to torque the bolt while holding the adjuster screw inplace. Way better than L allens and a standard box wrench.
 

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you 2 forget I worked at a dealership as a tech. and I've been working on my own stuff since I was 16. the gearwrench open end wrench sucks ass. it's garbage in my opinion. craftsman still makes pro grade tools sold to mechanics not sold in lowes and sears. everything I've put the open end of the gearwrench on has spread the jaws apart and it strips the head. same bolt with the craftsman and off it comes with no stripping. I've put a hand on more bikes than both of you put together.

 

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Yeah I've been working on my own stuff and sometimes other peoples for awhile also. But I can count the number of times I've seen a "Pro" Craftsmen on my third hand. The only time I even bother to pick up a GW, is for the ratcheting end. Otherwise the loose fitting SIX POINT Craftsmen sockets get me by. But I'm wise enough to leave 20 year old rust belt stuff alone.

This reminds me, I have a cracked Craftsmen socket I need to get exchanged... but where? Don't think there are any Sears stores left are there?
 

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Yeah I've been working on my own stuff and sometimes other peoples for awhile also. But I can count the number of times I've seen a "Pro" Craftsmen on my third hand. The only time I even bother to pick up a GW, is for the ratcheting end. Otherwise the loose fitting SIX POINT Craftsmen sockets get me by. But I'm wise enough to leave 20 year old rust belt stuff alone.

This reminds me, I have a cracked Craftsmen socket I need to get exchanged... but where? Don't think there are any Sears stores left are there?
nope. you're stuck with it lol. there's plenty of decent tools available. no one likes they're made in china etc but the truth is many of these tools have proven just as reliable as snap on or mac. lots of youtube videos to prove it. in fact I've seen some where a snap on ratchet fails and the harbor freight one doesn't. snap on also is notorious for not returning broken tools. but guys still buy them. we had a snap on battery charger at the bike shop that was almost new and the timer didn't work on it. the snap on rep wouldn't return it.

as for gearwrench wrenches. they're too soft. they do strip bolts with ease. not the closed end but the open end. husky makes a better wrench.

I'm in no way saying I'd run over harbor freight and buy a bunch of their tools. most of mine are from the 1990s. when craftsman made good tools. not all of them were great. but I have rarely stripped anything with them. the trick is knowing how to use your tools and picking the right one for the job. experience grasshoppers...
 
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