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Discussion Starter #1
I had my suspension setup at the track a few wks ago. Much better. Well worth $40. I was at the track again the following wk. I was getting a bit out of shape at the faster pace. The tech was on site again so he tweaked it. Little better. He did suggest I upgrade my suspension. He recommends getting the front forks valved etc and rear shock done. So here's the question:
When do you or did you upgrade your suspension for track/race use? I question this because the tech told me the stock suspension is not meant for the track pace we are running. Is this true? I also spoke with a couple instructors at the track. They all agreed a suspension upgrade is the way to go. I also burned off my tire in 3 days. Maybe due to the suspension???
I have an 06 R6 all stock. Just picked it up over the winter with ~5k mi. I run advanced/expert group in the 3 tracks I go to.
 

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At advanced/expert pace you are certainly pushing the stock suspension to the limits if not exceeding what it is meant to handle.

I upgraded my suspension early in my track career because I was well overdo for a suspension refresh and figured rather than just do the basics, I would go all the way with proper fork internals and a rear shock. The difference is honestly night and day.

Start looking for used stuff which you can then refresh and spring for your weight. Will be much cheaper than buying brand new.

As far as burning through your tire in 3 track days, what kind of wear were you getting? Did it look smooth like beach sand or were you seeing what looked like tearing? What type of tires are you running? Are you using warmers?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Start looking for used stuff which you can then refresh and spring for your weight. Will be much cheaper than buying brand new.

As far as burning through your tire in 3 track days, what kind of wear were you getting? Did it look smooth like beach sand or were you seeing what looked like tearing? What type of tires are you running? Are you using warmers?[/QUOTE]

One of the instructors has a set of forks he said he'd sell me. He used to race so not sure what the wear/tear would be. I guess I'd have to find out what his internals are set for to make sure it would work for me correct?
Running Pirreli SC V2's. Tire wear is pretty even/smooth. Unfortunately I do not have warmers yet. So that accounts for some of the use with the heat cycles. I flipped the tires around too. Still only 3 days. I can prob get one more day out of the rear.
I ran superbike pro slicks on my old 636 last yr. Once I got the pre-load set right the wear was pretty good. Before I got the suspension on the 636 set I burned off the front tire in 3 days but the rear I could have got at least 3 if not 4 more days out of it. Sold the bike though :)
 

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One of the instructors has a set of forks he said he'd sell me. He used to race so not sure what the wear/tear would be. I guess I'd have to find out what his internals are set for to make sure it would work for me correct?
There are numerous different brands and models of fork internals available, but the main thing that is individualized on a per rider basis is the spring rate. Different spring rates are meant for different rider weights. Additionally, the fork oil weight is customizable. If you are buying used forks, I recommend you have a suspension tech pull them apart for refresh and inspection. If the spring is not correct for your weight, have him swap in the right one.

Running Pirreli SC V2's. Tire wear is pretty even/smooth. Unfortunately I do not have warmers yet. So that accounts for some of the use with the heat cycles. I flipped the tires around too. Still only 3 days. I can prob get one more day out of the rear. I ran superbike pro slicks on my old 636 last yr. Once I got the pre-load set right the wear was pretty good. Before I got the suspension on the 636 set I burned off the front tire in 3 days but the rear I could have got at least 3 if not 4 more days out of it. Sold the bike though :)
Not having warmers certainly hurts, but a proper rear shock will definitely smooth out tire wear and increase longevity as well. I too sold my 2006 636 after last season and made the switch to team Yamaha :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
There are numerous different brands and models of fork internals available, but the main thing that is individualized on a per rider basis is the spring rate. Different spring rates are meant for different rider weights. Additionally, the fork oil weight is customizable. If you are buying used forks, I recommend you have a suspension tech pull them apart for refresh and inspection. If the spring is not correct for your weight, have him swap in the right one.
So I might as well use my forks and get the correct springs oil etc. I'd have to get dif springs and oil anyway if I bought the set that already built. Guy is a dif weight.


Not having warmers certainly hurts, but a proper rear shock will definitely smooth out tire wear and increase longevity as well. I too sold my 2006 636 after last season and made the switch to team Yamaha :)
A few wks ago it was a little cooler as rain was coming in, there was deffinate cold tear. Last wkend was good and hot. Did not notice the cold tear like the wk before. Warmers are on my list of things to get. Seems to be the faster you go the more expensive it gets:)

Thanks for the info.
 

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Three days out of a rear race tire sounds pretty good to me. I'm not sure what you're expecting to get.

When you say the tire is done - is it physically out of tread, or is it just hard and slippery from the heat cycles? If you've run through the tread, the warmers probably aren't gonna get you much more life.

FWIW, I usually use a rear for a race weekend, then run it for the trackday before the next race weekend, then throw on a new on for qualifying the next day. I usually change the front every two rears, and it's more so from the heat cycles than running out of tread on the front. This is with warmers, running Pirelli DSCs. Got about the same wear from Bridgestone R10s.
 

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I am actually debating the same thing you are right now. I've got an 06 with stock suspension. Running in expert track day pace. Mid pack maybe. Definitely not that great. So to start off, I've been told by the Pirelli dealer, and noticed myself that the pirellis seem to wear different every single day, and really confuse you about the tire wear. I had some nasty nasty tears almost like cold tears and they said you basically can't get rid of it sometimes. They honestly said they don't know why the tires do that, but they have zero problems with the grip level. They said to make sure the pressures are spot on especially after lunch when it's getting hot out. I asked the same question. Do I need better suspension? He said no. He said he recommends it for the pace in running, but not necessarily for the tires. He mentioned it would help, but only slightly. But honestly I would highly recommend you run warmers. 3 days on a race compound is good. Race rubber is meant to be best to shit and then replaced. Going fast is expensive. What compound are you running? Sc0-1-2? The sc1 I've gotten 3 days of track days and the sc2 I've pushed to 5-6 days. But it is totally junk by then.

As far as suspension, get it. My problem is trying to find used stuff. I can never seem to find used stuff for a great deal. Only like 100-200 bucks off new stuff and at that point I'll drop the extra money for the peace of mind of having good stuff. The k-tech stuff is fantastic. No questions about it. The fastest guys around here are using that and ohlins, and honestly admitted they like the feedback of the k-tech better. They also said the pressurized forks are better, but it takes a pro to realize and take advantage of the benefits.

Good luck :)
 

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I run upper intermediate to bottom advanced pace. I was crushing all the dudes in the intermediate level but now I am the one getting smacked by most of the advanced fleet.

I am still running Pirelli DRC's and am starting to get some sliding out of them and even some some signs of tearing on the rear of the tire grooves my last day out which could be a sign that I am right around the overheating range of the tire.

I am running Penske 20mm cartridges up front and a Penske double clicker in the rear. These components were on the bike when I purchased it, so I cant speak to price, but I was able to get my stuff super cheap for my last bike, an 06 ZX6R. I got a used Penske double clicker rear shock off eBay for $250 and then had it refreshed and sprung for my weight for an extra $150. I bought a used set of forks with 20mm Penske internals and had them refreshed and sprung for my weight, $520 all in with my forks handed over in exchange.

There is nothing wrong with buying used suspension components so long as they have not been damaged. They can always be refreshed and resprung which should make them good as new as far as Im concerned.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Three days out of a rear race tire sounds pretty good to me. I'm not sure what you're expecting to get.

When you say the tire is done - is it physically out of tread, or is it just hard and slippery from the heat cycles? If you've run through the tread, the warmers probably aren't gonna get you much more life.

FWIW, I usually use a rear for a race weekend, then run it for the trackday before the next race weekend, then throw on a new on for qualifying the next day. I usually change the front every two rears, and it's more so from the heat cycles than running out of tread on the front. This is with warmers, running Pirelli DSCs. Got about the same wear from Bridgestone R10s.
The rear tire I can get another day out of prob. The tread on the front tire is gone. Running the Pirreli SCV2's from riders discount. With the diablo supercorsa I could get at least 7-8 days out of the front 4-5 out of the rear. I may be a little quicker on the new bike but it may be the softer compound. I could try to drop down to a harder compound tire or go back to the super corsa. Not sure if that is wise though as the pace increases. The instructors at the track are getting more life out of the Dunlop GPA's. Of course they are only instructing in intermediate, beginner level. So that might make a dif as well. However, they are running 10x as many laps as they are running multiple days and levels. So it's prob a combination of the suspension and the tire compound. You'd think I would burn off the rear before the front. But it's the front that is spent. That is what leads me to look at the front forks/suspension.
 

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"The Dude abides .. "
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after keeping good tires on the bike, suspension is the first place a rider should spend "upgrade" funds on..

consider the JRi "street fighter" shock. It's about $800 vs. $1400 for a 3-way adjustable wammy-jammy shock (from Jri, Ohlins, Penske, etc).
And a 20mm kit for the forks is a good place to start for sure. A revalve from a qualified suspension tech on forks is money well spent.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Suspension upgrade it is. I pretty much bottomed out the front forks this past wkend. Feels pretty loose in a couple fast turns.
I'm pretty light ~ 135lbs. Is the rear shock upgrade going to make that much difference? Plan on doing the front forks 1st.
 
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