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I like to do a session out there to get a feel for it, then I do the "two gears, no brakes" drill on the track the next session to get a better idea of the flow of the track, braking zones, etc, and if I'm still not feeling it I'll ask an instructor or control rider to give me a tow and show me the line. Usually takes me half a day to get comfortable on a new track.
 

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KneeDragger#555
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I always print out a couple of track maps and take notes after every practice session/race. I mark things like braking markers, gear, points of reference etc. it has always helped me when racing new tracks and its great to have when you go back next year. Its also good to keep track of gearing and suspension setups as well.
 

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When in doubtThrottle out
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Review track maps before going out, learn the general layout of the track.

Look over the track at the start of the day to identify elevation changes, on or off camber turns.

Start riding mid track and working your turn in and exit from there. Once you learn it better then you can adjust your turn in and exit outward for more speed.
 

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track junkie
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Do any of you have a particular system, or series of things you do in order to learn a new track quickly? What things do you find work well to help you remember a new track and learn it fast?

Misti
get a tow from someone who knows the track. they can show you all the ins and outs of an unfamiliar track.

fortunately (or unfortunately, however you see it) i've never been fast enough to have problems learning my way around a new track. take a couple warm-ups, find my braking zones and potential problem areas, then i'm off. of course, the last time i was at an unfamiliar track, i didn't have tire warmers and HAD to take it easy the first few laps.

also, i think maybe autocross helped me a little. you sorta have to memorize the tracks in that game...


s3aturnr
 

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pin it to win it
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I like to get a tow for a few laps just to learn the line then I focus on 1 turn or section at a time. Then work on stringing them together.
 

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For those who are getting tows.... be sure to ask someone that 1. knows the line 2. isn't going WAY past your pace 3. knows you're following them :laugh

I was following someone who was faster than me and he went through a turn and I was like HOLY SHIT and almost went down :laugh
 

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Suk it, Lee
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^ yep. :laugh

I was being towed by an instructor (I guess, that, I found out later, apparently has a horrible line.

I figured it out eventually, but it helps to have someone who knows right off the bat.

Did have some really useful advise for me though, so that helped a lot


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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pin it to win it
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For those who are getting tows.... be sure to ask someone that 1. knows the line 2. isn't going WAY past your pace 3. knows you're following them :laugh

I was following someone who was faster than me and he went through a turn and I was like HOLY SHIT and almost went down :laugh
I try to get tows from control riders. once you got the track down I like them to go a lil faster than I do. Kinda shows me how much more speed I can carry into a turn.
 

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I try to get tows from control riders. once you got the track down I like them to go a lil faster than I do. Kinda shows me how much more speed I can carry into a turn.
Tows are DEFINITELY an awesome way to pick up your pace and I agree that seeing someone go through that turn at a certain speed lets you know you can (kind of) do the same too :laugh
 

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pin it to win it
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I remember my first td. the cr told me to follow him, and by the end of the first lap he was at least 4 sec ahead of me lol
 

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"The Dude abides .. "
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so much of this totally depends on your ability..

watching various youtube videos with a track map in hand is ideal. You should do this a couple dozen times BEFORE you go, not while there. It really helps if it's from a good rider, and better if on a similar bike. However even a slow rider on not an ideal line can give you a preview of what to look for. Braking zones/markers, the layout, elevation change (not that video does that justice but better than nothing)..

Often getting a tow if you are a beginner, ends up with that rider doing nothing more than trying not to crash following a rider that although not much better (in some cases) knows the track.
Control riders should be helpful, some are.. some are not.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Good tips!

A lot of you mention watching track videos or getting a tow around the track to learn the lines, but then what.....how do you take what you see someone else doing around the circuit and apply it to yourself and your own riding? How do you remember what they have shown you or how do you know that it is the best way for you to get around the track?

Misti
 

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When in doubtThrottle out
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You make sure that the people you have towing you around have experience, at the very least with that track.
 

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I've not been to a track in person, but when racing tracks in video games (I know, I know) I go out wide-eyed for about 5-10 laps and try to remember the feelings, flow, markers, etc...and string together a few corners until I can string them all together. Then it's figuring out at what points you can go quicker and what corners you can cut and get away with.
 

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Reference Points.

Code has a decent description. They are all the clues on the track. Curbs, paint marks, splotches, holes, bumps...all of these things can be used as reference points.

Turn 7 at VIR, white spot and bump to hit after turn-in, aim to the inside of the big splotch, at the splotch go to maintenance throttle to avoid running wide and so on and so on...

A good control rider (hat tip JRA) can follow you, figure out where you are lost, pass and start pointing out reference marks.

You may not use them the same as a faster or even similar pace rider, but they give you points to work off of. For instance I can't brake as hard as the rider on race rubber, but I can use his brake marker and back off it "x" feet and work towards it.

Another rider who is familiar with and actively thinking about reference points can get me going quicker in a single conversation than following a fast rider all day.
 
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