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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I'm super new to riding (and not too mechanically inclined), and I just bought a 2007 R6 yesterday, and it only had 4000km on it. It hadn't been used for about a year, so the battery was dead, and I needed to boost it to get her started. I rode it around for a little bit to charge the battery, and shut it off. When I came out again to start her up, I had to boost it again. This time, after I got her started, the throttle wouldn't work. When I open the throttle, nothing happens...the engine doesn't rev at all. I asked some of my friends what the problem was, and they said they've never heard of that happening before. Any ideas would be VERY appreciated! (I can't ride her anywhere, because no throttle control...but I can get her started if I boost)

Thanks in advance for your help!


drew
 

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im pretty sure riding around wont charge your battery. It will hold the charge but unlike a car it wont re-charge the more you ride. (if that makes any sense)
if this were true you could only ride a few minutes... and always need to either re charge your battery... or buy a new one...
you bike has an "alternator" called a stator, which will charge your battery as you ride.

To the OP, pop the battery out, head to auto-zone and have them do a free load test on it, if the battery checks out, and holds a charge, then your problem sounds like something with the bikes charging system, which you want fixed before you end up blowing fuses and/or frying shit.
To check this, once you have a working battery in there, (should have 12-13 volt with the bike off), you now need to start your bike, and check the voltage at the battery at idle. it should be about the same as with bike off, about 12-13 volt, then rev the engine to ~5000 rpm while in neutral, and hold it steady while once again checking the voltage at the battery. it should now be climbing to atleast like 13.8 volt, no more then like 14.8 volt. If it climbs above that, your voltage regulator rectifier needs to be replaced, if it does not climb, it could either be your stator, or the rectifier, or both.

to check your stator, locate the harness from stator to the voltage regulator rectifier, (3 white wires 1 black 1 red), and check the resistance of the 3 white wires using the service manual.
My bike is much older then yours but i believe it is all the same as far as the chargin system goes.

oh yea .. welcome to the forum! and i noticed u said you are not very mechanically inclined, i know reading that once may seem a little confusing, but read it slow its all very simple stuff that you can definately do yourself. As long as you know how to use a multimeter..
 

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if this were true you could only ride a few minutes... and always need to either re charge your battery... or buy a new one...
you bike has an "alternator" called a stator, which will charge your battery as you ride.

To the OP, pop the battery out, head to auto-zone and have them do a free load test on it, if the battery checks out, and holds a charge, then your problem sounds like something with the bikes charging system, which you want fixed before you end up blowing fuses and/or frying shit.
To check this, once you have a working battery in there, (should have 12-13 volt with the bike off), you now need to start your bike, and check the voltage at the battery at idle. it should be about the same as with bike off, about 12-13 volt, then rev the engine to ~5000 rpm while in neutral, and hold it steady while once again checking the voltage at the battery. it should now be climbing to atleast like 13.8 volt, no more then like 14.8 volt. If it climbs above that, your voltage regulator rectifier needs to be replaced, if it does not climb, it could either be your stator, or the rectifier, or both.

to check your stator, locate the harness from stator to the voltage regulator rectifier, (3 white wires 1 black 1 red), and check the resistance of the 3 white wires using the service manual.
My bike is much older then yours but i believe it is all the same as far as the chargin system goes.
I understand what a stator is... this isnt my first rodeo here.

What im saying is if you get a jump and then ride around, your battery will not gain much of a charge enabling it to start up under its own power the next time you want to start it. You will need another jump. Until you recharge the battery or buy a new one
 

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I understand what a stator is... this isnt my first rodeo here.

What im saying is if you get a jump and then ride around, your battery will not gain much of a charge enabling it to start up under its own power the next time you want to start it. You will need another jump. Until you recharge the battery or buy a new one
yeh put the stator thing in there more for the op as he seemed to not know much about his bike yet.
but yes the bike will recharge your battery on its own, i know this for a fact because i have done it.

also for the OP, if you are jumping your bike to get it running, avoid using a car to jump it, ive done this myself, until i learned you can mess up your bike pretty bad doing this. If you have to do it, do it with the car OFF.
 

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It hadn't been used for about a year, so the battery was dead, and I needed to boost it to get her started.
You should invest in a battery tender to charge the depleted battery (and help maintain the battery during long periods of non-use). Battery isn't meant to be charged by the motorcycle's charging system. :flex:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hey everyone, sorry about the huge delay in response...

So it turns out I'm a total NOOB. The odometer had the fault code "60" which I understand means: "Throttle servo motor: open or short circuit detected. Defective throttle servo motor. Malfunction in ECU (servo motor driving system)."

So anyways, my friend came and checked it out, and couldn't find what was wrong...then he changed the fuse, and she was back to new! Apparently the fuse was blown (maybe from jump starting the bike), but all it needed was a replacement.

So I apologize to everyone for me being so clueless! :( But thank you again for all your help, I really appreciate it! I'm glad to be a part of the forum! :D
 
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