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Zip ties and Duct tape
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I have read pretty much every thread on this topic and there really doesn't seem to be a conclusive answer. I just changed my oil the other day and according to the manual, you are supposed to put 31ft/lbs on the plug. I have heard this is kind of a "no-no" on this bike so here's what i did instead:

Drained oil, replaced the crush washer with a genuine Yamaha factory OEM one (cost about 13$), i then tightened the plug down to 25 ft/lbs using a torque wrench until i heard the click. Everything felt fine. I guess i wanna know if this spec is okay to do. The last thing I want is to pull that plug back out next oil change and have the threads come with it... I REALLY don't like to do things by "feel" as i have had that land me in some deep trouble on past projects. Looking for some peace of mind that i did everything correctly. The plug doesn't leak at all, and from what I've read, you will know that you have stripped the threads if the bolt were to keep spinning, or if oil starts to leak out and around the plug, neither of which i have. But that information was pertaining to cars, but i assumed it would be the same for bikes? Again just looking for the peace of mind from some more knowledgeable sources.
 

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Gearhead at work likes to use a 1/4" drive socket wrench when tightening oil pan drain plug so as not not risk stripping it out, so I started doing that. The general shade-tree suggestion on my old bike was to avoid torque specs on anything going into the engine case because torquing to spec would risk stripping out the threads. I only use a torque wrench when the threads are steel to steel, with a 10% to 15% derate if lubrication is present

IMHO torque wrench click is not a substitute for feel- very important to develop the latter so you know when things feel right or not.
 

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My R6 eat tires for lunch
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I have NEVER brought a new washer for my drain plug. All my cars, truck,bikes, i've changed oil hundreds of times. All done by feel,snug fit and a tad bit more. Never once had a problem.
 

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Touchdown!
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The engineers who designed the system, they analyzed it correctly. Then, they wrote the usage procedure. I tend to follow it. I'll suggest those who want to do it correctly, they should do the same.
 

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bad idea homeslice. especially if youre asking on the internet, you most likely don't even know how to properly use a torque wrench. not trying to be a dick. but there is a proper way and most people don't even know it. and I just hate seeing post about guys stripping the oil pan with a torque wrench. if you don't own a $200 torque wrench it's off. and they're off by 10 to 15ft/lbs usually. especially a harbor freight special. guys love those $10 piles of garbage. but they end up ****ing up your shit.
if I were you i would just try to tighten it by hand close to what it felt like removing it. unless it's almost falling out now. once the bolt bottoms on the pan just put a little more pressure on it. that's all it needs.


 

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Why yes I don't!!!!!!!!!!
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The engineers who designed the system, they analyzed it correctly. Then, they wrote the usage procedure. I tend to follow it. I'll suggest those who want to do it correctly, they should do the same.
um take the blinders off pal.
Id love to show those "engineers" how great their tapping threads into aluminum engine cases does in the real world.
Also working around engineers on a daily basis... they are often receptive to "alternate" solutions from field people.

In this case... repeated torquing of the aluminum drain plug will result in stripped threads regardless of how ginger one is. Especially with a steel drain bolt. Best solution... a drain valve.
 

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what brand of torque wrench do you recommend?
you can buy a $10 one. as long as you have it checked and calibrated. even knowing how far it's off is way better than buying one from the store and just using it. that way you can compensate your settings. I just wouldnt use the service manual for the oil drain. 25ft/lbs is massive on that bolt. bottom the bolt and use a little more pressure with a wrench and it's fine. get one of those drain valves from stahlbus. you just connect the hose like an air hose and thats it.

I don't even like snap on stuff. I only trust stuff like Norbar.
 

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Touchdown!
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um take the blinders off pal.
Id love to show those "engineers" how great their tapping threads into aluminum engine cases does in the real world.
Also working around engineers on a daily basis... they are often receptive to "alternate" solutions from field people.

In this case... repeated torquing of the aluminum drain plug will result in stripped threads regardless of how ginger one is. Especially with a steel drain bolt. Best solution... a drain valve.
Here we go again. You always want to argue and debate like you're a woman in heat (no disrespect to women - it has been studies done to show women like to argue because of a mix of biology, chemistry, and emotions).

There's no additional loading on the bolt or the oil pan (maybe the exertion of the oil pushing on the bolt from inside the oil pan, but that's miniscule compared to the tensile strength of both materials). It's basically just the clamping force between the three components: drain plug, crush gasket, and oil pan. Heat play's a factor, but thermal expansion has been factored in. If the bolt is removed correctly and reinstalled correctly to the proper specs, it'll work for 100,000+ miles.

I would explain about hardware I designed for military helicopters that are in use using an assortment of different alloys, but what's the purpose? You seem to know everything - not! Again, I credit you with some valuable information a lot of the time, but not always.

Granted, engineers can make mistakes, but the ones at Yamaha, the ones in charge of this system, naaaa. They've been doing it way too long. They've got it corrected and perfected AT THE VERY LEAST 20 years ago (realistically it's more ike 40+ years ago).
 

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WTH happened here LoL? Fellas, using torque specifications ain't "fake news" LoL. It's how the factory assembled your engine... assembled your bike. It's how the racing pit crews tighten lug nuts on cars, again, and again, and again, and... Use a quality torque wrench and follow the specifications. Pay attention and don't set for Ft-Lbs when the specification is in In-Lbs. Documentation errors do occur but they are rare. For some of the scenarios mentioned, undertightening can damage your threads as well as overtightening. Let's get back to debating more controversial things again... like the best oil.

If the threads aren't holding proper torque spec then they were already damaged from over/under tightening.
 

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WTH happened here LoL? Fellas, using torque specifications ain't "fake news" LoL. It's how the factory assembled your engine... assembled your bike. It's how the racing pit crews tighten lug nuts on cars, again, and again, and again, and... Use a quality torque wrench and follow the specifications. Pay attention and don't set for Ft-Lbs when the specification is in In-Lbs. Documentation errors do occur but they are rare. For some of the scenarios mentioned, undertightening can damage your threads as well as overtightening. Let's get back to debating more controversial things again... like the best oil.

If the threads aren't holding proper torque spec then they were already damaged from over/under tightening.
again, the problem comes from a few things.
1. not knowing how to properly use a torque wrench. yes, there is a proper way. and almost no wrench comes with instructions. too fast, you wont get a proper setting. wrong angle, you wont get a proper setting, dry bolt, you wont get a proper setting, wrong type of bolt lube, you wont get a proper setting. holding the wrench in the wrong spot on the handle, you wont get a true setting. there are tons of things a user must know first. just because the wrench clicked doesn't mean it's right.
2. cheap out of calibration tools that are never verified before use and never checked or calibrated for the life of the tool. you don't even know if it's torquing anything properly. hence why doing it by feel is best.

it's best not to torque a oil pan bolt in my opinion. you guys do what you want but you've been warned by someone whos done hundreds of oil changes and have seen several dozens of posts of stripped oil pans from the use of a torque wrench.

and yes lube on a bolt plays a huge role on the proper torque specs.


 

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PeanutEOD on YouTube
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I didn’t know the lube part. Interesting. I still say the best way to tighten an oil drain plug is by hand, and then safety wire it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Why yes I don't!!!!!!!!!!
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...
There's no additional loading on the bolt or the oil pan (maybe the exertion of the oil pushing on the bolt from inside the oil pan, but that's miniscule compared to the tensile strength of both materials). It's basically just the clamping force between the three components: drain plug, crush gasket, and oil pan. Heat play's a factor, but thermal expansion has been factored in. If the bolt is removed correctly and reinstalled correctly to the proper specs, it'll work for 100,000+ miles.

I would explain about hardware I designed for military helicopters that are in use using an assortment of different alloys, but what's the purpose? You seem to know everything - not! Again, I credit you with some valuable information a lot of the time, but not always.

Granted, engineers can make mistakes, but the ones at Yamaha, the ones in charge of this system, naaaa. They've been doing it way too long. They've got it corrected and perfected AT THE VERY LEAST 20 years ago (realistically it's more ike 40+ years ago).
hilarious. Exactly how many engineers are in charge of the drain bolt specs? Im going to say 0.
Talk about woman facts... we aren't discussing military helicopters or resumes. We are discussing CAST ALUMINUM R6 oil pans and M14 STEEL drain plugs along with COPPER crush washers.

Please provide your citations of all the datas that went into specing a M14 drain plug...lol.
Then provide the datas for the M6 case bolts that are galled from the factory assembly line.

Also a skilled (flat rate) wrench IS NOT pulling out a torque wrench to tighten a drain plug or case bolt. I know some dyed in the wool lab coat praising mother effers like to think that putting a torque wrench on every bolt is a necessity but... they'd be wrong. Some dont even risk "blindly" threading a steel plug into a cast pan to insure no galled threads.

Maybe you can show us a pie chart with 230 degree oil, soaking/circulating in a cast aluminum pan and how much thread stretch is happening during cooling cycles. :fact
 

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again, the problem comes from a few things.
1. not knowing how to properly use a torque wrench. yes, there is a proper way. and almost no wrench comes with instructions. too fast, you wont get a proper setting. wrong angle, you wont get a proper setting, dry bolt, you wont get a proper setting, wrong type of bolt lube, you wont get a proper setting. holding the wrench in the wrong spot on the handle, you wont get a true setting. there are tons of things a user must know first. just because the wrench clicked doesn't mean it's right.
2. cheap out of calibration tools that are never verified before use and never checked or calibrated for the life of the tool. you don't even know if it's torquing anything properly. hence why doing it by feel is best.

it's best not to torque a oil pan bolt in my opinion. you guys do what you want but you've been warned by someone whos done hundreds of oil changes and have seen several dozens of posts of stripped oil pans from the use of a torque wrench.

and yes lube on a bolt plays a huge role on the proper torque specs.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FjBaWo0QMYU&t=27s
The torque wrench may not come with detailed instructions, but the manuals especially for critical areas, will tell you what lubrication to use and how to tighten in stages. Many manuals for example, will specify engine oil as lubrication for head bolts; as well as details about whether fasteners should be reused, removal of debris, thread cleaning, etcetera. It is undoubtedly true that in many cases, all these details get ignored. It's also a good thing that torque specifications are typically provided in the form of minimum/maximum; where aiming for the middle or a little higher, should land one within the range; albeit with inconsistent results; which can be important for critical areas.

Again, if the threads aren't holding torque spec, then they were already damaged from under/over tightening.
 

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we are only discussing a bolt that needs to seal to hold back a liquid not under pressure.
it's doesn't need to be 25ft/lbs. for fu ck sakes thats the same torque as the brake calipers. which has more force applied to them?

if it makes you sleep better at night then use a torque wrench. I would suggest you invest in a small 1/4 or 3/8 in drive wrench over a 1/2" drive just so there is less leverage for you to strip the pan.
and to be 100% honest, if I owned a shop and you feel the need to torque a drain plug I'd fire you. because you lack basic mechanical aptitude.
 

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People brought up other scenarios and that's what I was responding to; and in general it is correct to use what the manual specifies as torque. It was also mentioned that documentation errors do occur, but they are rare, as well as the fact that threads not holding torque are already damaged.

...... it's doesn't need to be 25ft/lbs. .............................
SPECIFIC TO THE THREAD TITLE, I just looked up the spec for the "Engine oil drain bolt" in "LIT-11616-R6-01_2005 YZF-R6_YZFR6T_S +2008 2009 YZF-R6S models.pdf" and it specifies 31 Ft-Lbs. Here's the general torque spec sheet based on fastener size. https://1drv.ms/u/s!AhsZJDCN8kMMgaRBpFEcyOr_j-WUPg (note: have to measure shaft diameter to get the general spec on bolts) Don't know whether the ISO standard might account for thread material.

From personal experiences in general I only do "push tight" on drain bolts, using a 3/8 with an average length handle; box wrench or ratchet. I can't say precisely what torque that would be, but don't think it's as high as 31 Ft-Lbs. (I'm a feather weight, not middle or heavy.) Pull-tight, I would damage, if not strip the threads, so I don't do that. I have found one drain bolt loose before. Fortunately I got to it, as it was starting to back out. The non-OEM washer instead of being plastic, was a standard hardware-store type metal with rubber attached to the inner diameter. (I didn't like it from the moment I looked at it but kept using it anyway.) That rubber had worn away from repeated changes. I replaced that washer with a plastic one (like OEM) and hadn't had a repeat.

That said, I am surprised to see that the spec is so high. It's undoubtedly what the factory used. That won't damage the threads... the first or second time around, but with repeated changes over multiple years, I'd expect that it would result with rapid wear... and eventually result with seizure (<-- from cross-thread) and/or strip. I'm generally stringent about looking up and following torque, but haven't ever done so with a drain bolt until you mentioned 25 Ft-Lbs. I was curious to see was it really that high, only to see that it was even higher. Without a car being on a lift or tall jack stands, there generally isn't room for properly operating a torque wrench anyway. As a shade-tree and for oil changes, I didn't have to jack up my previous car at all, only need small race ramps for my current one (can't get a standard jack under it anyway), and I do my changes with the fairings on, for the motorcycle.
 
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