Yamaha R6 Forum: YZF-R6 Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
At the track and I'm struggling with transition from strait to slower turns I'm good through sweepers and through short straits to turns. High speed strait to 2nd and 3rd gear turns I struggle with keeping my body back in the seat so I can slide. I have stomp grip but pinching tank with the legs did not seem to work as I would imagined but going from 140 to 60 is taking a toll on the hands. What do you do? What are my options? Iv heard a few different things from the coaches here but there are only so many of them.
 

·
Hey...watch this
Joined
·
574 Posts
Instead of concentrating on where you get on the brakes, start working on where you taper off the brakes. When you find yourself with more time than you need to let off, then you know you can get on the brakes later. It's best to get off the bike before you get to the turn, but this makes hard braking tough, since you need to be very light on the bars. I use my stomp grips while the rear wheel is up, and slide off the bike as I start trail braking into the apex.
 

·
"The Dude abides .. "
Joined
·
4,719 Posts
don't try and push yourself back on the bike with the bars, stomp grip won't really help. people think it does, but come on.. it can only do so much. Your leg it tipping out to feel the lean with a knee slider, so how much can stop grip really help?

rest up against the tank, or, consider getting a Sharkskinz seat pan and stick on foam pad. WAY more grippy than the vinyl covered stock seat. Homestead raceway in FL is a track with multiple hard braking zones, my chest is more tired after a weekend of riding/racing there, than from 2 hours straight on the dirt bike in the woods where i train.. you have to have some pressure on the bars, as it's the main way you steer the bike into the corner (countnersteer).

the topic question you posed was a little different than what you ask in the text of your post. Brake markers are incredibly important. there is no way you can predictably navigate a corner with any kind of pace without utilizing the brake markers on the track.. and/or some fixed reference points for turn in. Wonder how expert racers turn fast laps within a few 1/10ths of all the laps? using brake markers and other reference points.

start with an early marker, (say the "4" marker). if you get to the apex and it was too easy, go a little past the 4 next time.. remember what you do for each corner on the track..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
I squeeze the tank with both knees under hard braking with stomp grip. I also kind of press backwards into the pegs (if that makes sense) and really focus on keeping the weight off the arms. Sometimes sitting back in the seat a little bit will help get your knees tighter into the tank cut outs and will use the stronger muscles in the legs then if you are sitting too close to the tank.

I also agree with working on finding good RP's for your braking markers, including where to let off the brakes.

would you say your braking goes from super hard initially and tapers off, or do you gently get on the brakes to start and squeeze harder as you approach turn in?

Misti
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I'll try to keep it simple haha. Redid the pads rotors and lines have way more confidence and I was braking way later. The issue I had this time was I was sliding into the tank. So as I leaned my man hood is pointing opposite of where I want to go so I'm curled around the tank if that makes since. So I'm using my arms and upper body at the last second to get back off the tank. I would like to keep off the tank so I can get off the seat a little more and get my leg and upper body out to keep the bike up a little more. I didn't feel like I was able to carry the corner speed this time. So my question is what are the different options to keep the bum back in the seat in the heavy braking zone. A coach suggested I move my pegs forward a little more and use my legs to push back didn't get the chance to try because the sky water came. What are my other options.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Misti

would you say your braking goes from super hard initially and tapers off, or do you gently get on the brakes to start and squeeze harder as you approach turn in?

I taper off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,913 Posts
At the track and I'm struggling with transition from strait to slower turns I'm good through sweepers and through short straits to turns. High speed strait to 2nd and 3rd gear turns I struggle with keeping my body back in the seat so I can slide. I have stomp grip but pinching tank with the legs did not seem to work as I would imagined but going from 140 to 60 is taking a toll on the hands. What do you do? What are my options? Iv heard a few different things from the coaches here but there are only so many of them.
roebling comes to mind... Im tucked, pop up out of a tuck, let off the gas, and start downshifting & trail braking into the fast right.
Body position is important to set your speed and load the front enough that you have adequate traction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
Never stab the brakes on initial bite... you're going to fly over the bars.

It's all about progression to be smooth:

BRAKES : 0% - 10% - 30% - 50% - 70% - 80% - 70% - 50% - 30% - 10% - 0%
THROTTLE: 100% - 0% - 0% - 0% - 0% - 0% - 0% - 0% - 0% - 2% - 10%

This is how I would do it, coming up to a hard braking zone. I would never be at 80% braking in zone 2. I also never put myself in a situation where I need to use that last 20% of braking (100%). I've tucked the front plenty of times doing that. Smooth is fast. Easy in, fast out.
 

·
"The Dude abides .. "
Joined
·
4,719 Posts
don't stab the brakes, but you can get on em pretty darn hard after you settle the front end .. it's all what you are comfortable with, and what your skill dictates. You may WANT to get on the brakes harder to brake later, but your skill may not back it up ;)

if you haven't READ Twist of the Wrist II , you should.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,913 Posts
Never stab the brakes on initial bite... you're going to fly over the bars.

It's all about progression to be smooth:

BRAKES : 0% - 10% - 30% - 50% - 70% - 80% - 70% - 50% - 30% - 10% - 0%
THROTTLE: 100% - 0% - 0% - 0% - 0% - 0% - 0% - 0% - 0% - 2% - 10%

This is how I would do it, coming up to a hard braking zone. I would never be at 80% braking in zone 2. I also never put myself in a situation where I need to use that last 20% of braking (100%). I've tucked the front plenty of times doing that. Smooth is fast. Easy in, fast out.
70-80% brakes is ALOT with 0 throttle. When I first started... a local guy showed me a neat drill. You find a nice desolate road... setup some cones and then pull 3-4 gears at WFO before the cone... and use it at your brake reference. It was important to let off the throttle right at the cone (everytime) to get the most out of the drill. What it gives you is a feel for exactly how much you can scrub off.
A fast straight like roebling or the back at Road Atlanta... Id say a fast club level guy is using ~60% of their brakes power. However a turn like museum one at Barber might go to about 75% (enough to get the back tire airborne & set the front end for the downhill right)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
Misti

would you say your braking goes from super hard initially and tapers off, or do you gently get on the brakes to start and squeeze harder as you approach turn in?

I taper off.
When racing or track day riding I would get on the brakes harder initially (at my brake marker) and then taper off as I entered the corner. WOT to hard brakes and then coming out of the brakes. This does not mean that I'm stabling or jabbing at the brakes, it is always smooth and progressive but you can still get on the brakes hard enough.

A common error for riders is to charge the turn by waiting to late to apply the brakes and having to stab at them, or by beginning their brake progression slowly and then having to add more right before turn in. We often call this charging the turn. It becomes choppy and unpredictable.

What are some things that can really help with the consistency of your braking?

Misti
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top