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R6 is Love. R6 is Life.
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we cant forget about the trail braking legends Marc Marquez and Danny Pedrosa who really do not get enough credit for some of their entries intense...





just attempting to practice shit like this makes my balls quiver...
 

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aka: Mother Goose
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Why don't you define what you mean by entry corner because if it refers to trail braking then it isn't an entirely different topic.
Very true. This will be a little long, but a great read for track riders. If you haven't listened to Ken Hill's Podcasts, I highly recommend it. Just listening to those over and over, taking notes, and applying one thing at a time each session until I have that one thing down helped my riding tremendously.




RRW Series #3 Entry and Balanced Corners

Dang, this guy was fast. I worked my way to within three bikes length of him from turns 4-11 at Laguna Seca and out 11, even with my better exit, his 1000 pulled my 750 by another three bike lengths onto the straight. I passed under the bridge and crested over blind turn one, scanning for Turn two and lining myself up to go in as straight as I can, to get my bike lengths back. He had a good line going in and suddenly, he came back to me at an alarming rate, going to his brakes way earlier, and harder than I would have ever imagined, based on how I saw him ride the previous lap. As I approached my turn in point, I went sailing by him, nailed my entry apex and used my brakes to the slowest part of the corner, getting the bike pointed to drive off the second apex of turn two. That was a free pass, Thank You.

Later in the pits, I talked to that rider and he said turn two at Laguna was his worst turn because, “his front end wasn’t set-up right”. He said he needed stiffer fork springs to brake like I was able to…What that rider needed, instead of approaching every corner the same, was to understand that there are corners where the Entry lasts longer than the Exit, where the time of deceleration, is great than the time accelerating, Entry corners.

Turn two at Laguna is an 180 degree turn and a perfect example at of where an Entry turn is. With 180 degree turns, they can be broken up into two different turns, an “A” and a “B”. The A will always have a great Entry, there is no Exit off of A, it simply sets you up for B, the exit portion of the turn. So, to take advantage of Entry turns, use your brakes, to or past the apex. Entry turns are the place to maximize your entry speed. The rider I so easily passed going into Turn two, approached every turn as an Exit turn and that worked well, except at Laguna, he left three turns on the table, turns two, seven and eight. I used my brakes, lighter and longer, carrying more speed in, to take advantage of Turn two’s Entry. I didn’t need stiffer fork springs for that.

Are 180 degree turns the only Entry turns? No. With our example track of Laguna, Turns seven and eight also have more of an Entry than Exit, so approach as an Entry turn.

Balanced corners,-where the Entry and Exit have the same amount of deceleration and acceleration zones-can be approached as either an Entry turn or as an Exit turn, depending on your situation. Want to set up a pass on the brakes, no problem-Entry turn. Want to pass on the drive out-Exit turn. Given the choice with a Balanced turn, approach it as an Exit turn, as it is safer and more repeatable.
And exit corners...
With Exit turns, the goal is to get the bike slowed and pointed, so you can start your acceleration process as you go past the inside apex. As you drive off the turn, you should be able to add throttle points as you take away lean angle points, getting to your exit apex just as the bike is straight up and down. If a track has 10 turns and 7 of those turns are Exit turns, just getting those 7 turns correct will get you a pretty darn good lap time.

He explains these things in depth on the podcasts, which can explain it way better than I could just typing it out on a forum. You start to look at track maps differently and picking out the most important turns first (exit corners with the longest straight after) and then breaking down the track from there. Identifying your exit and entry corners.
 

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I'm a big Ken Hill, Nick Ienatsch, and YCRS fan as well as a YCRS grad and a coach.....

What I was trying to say is that most people really have a difficult time whether they be entry or exit corners, maintaining sufficient speed to be able to carry brakes at least to the apex. A very normal situation is riders who brake too early and too hard, and find that they've already established proper speed and direction - before the apex. Then they need to go to neutral throttle - or even maintenance throttle, just to get through the apex. Obviously, this allows the front suspension to extend and reduce the contact patch, serving to decrease grip and alter the chassis geometry so the bike really doesn't want to turn as easily. The saving grace is that usually the rider is already at a slower than necessary speed.....

The "lighter longer" axiom really demands that you carry a bit more speed through the corner, so that at the apex or just beyond (depending on whether it's an entry, balanced or exit corner) you've established speed and direction to start standing the bike up and getting on the drive to the exit. Optimum remaining travel for the R6 fork for example is about 100-110mm, and braking obviously isn't just to slow the bike down - it's to set the tire contact patch and bike geometry for optimal turning (smoothly). An awful lot of people leave an awful lot of speed on the table because they're braking too much on corner entry as opposed to that "lighter longer" technique. Even on Entry corners - it's still really difficult for most people to carry their brakes all the way. In fact, for myself, I have a harder time on entry corners, like T2 at Barber. And increasing elevation to the apex makes it even more problematic for me. Working hard on getting better.....
 

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Why yes I don't!!!!!!!!!!
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we cant forget about the trail braking legends Marc Marquez and Danny Pedrosa who really do not get enough credit for some of their entries intense...
just attempting to practice shit like this makes my balls quiver...
um they arent relevant to the conversation here. Marquez is absolutely fearless though. No reservation about dancing on the edge or over it. Any of the GP riders show brilliance so quickly its invisible to the naked eye sometimes!
 

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Trailbraking refers to the process of entering a turn while the front brake is still applied and gradually and smoothly releasing it as you move through the turn and get back on the gas.

Trailbraking is applicable in some corners where needed and may not be needed in others. I also dislike the general saying that you have to trailbrake all the way to the apex or that you have to wait until the apex to to get back on the gas. The general rule is that you should get on the gas ASAP in a corner once the bike is pointed in the direction you want to go. That could be before the apex, at the apex or in some cases even after the apex of the corner.

You can find more about trail braking in an article I wrote here:

What would you say are the main benefits of trail braking? How could you go about effectively learning how to trailbrake?
Nice article

Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk
 

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Didn't you know?

Marquez is an alien sent here from space to show us how to ride motorcycles and make us all look bad.
you can do that on the bikes with abs. or at least on the R1. I get the rear to dance around braking at mid ohio coming down from 165 or so into turn 4.
too chicken to do it on my old R6. the R1 links the front and rear brake and uses a gyro to keep the rear wheel down. but its slightly coming up under hard braking and the rear dances around but never gets out of hand.
 

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R6 is Love. R6 is Life.
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149 Posts
you can do that on the bikes with abs. or at least on the R1. I get the rear to dance around braking at mid ohio coming down from 165 or so into turn 4.
too chicken to do it on my old R6. the R1 links the front and rear brake and uses a gyro to keep the rear wheel down. but its slightly coming up under hard braking and the rear dances around but never gets out of hand.
dude those tires are like 5-6 inches off the ground...
 
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