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Discussion Starter #1
Gents,

I recently did my first track day at Mid-Ohio, which was awesome. According to my instructor...my body position was great. We did the leap frog drill and he said my big problem was turning in way too early. This effected the following corners. Which I didn't think about until he said that. I was constantly adjusting my throttle postion mid turn to hold a line (which was bad). My goal was to be as smooth on the throttle for that day too :lmao

With that said...I was let loose and worked on turning in later, which made a huge difference in speed and the following corners. My lean angle was much...much better as well.

My question is...if you don't have an instructor to tell you where the lines are....how do you choose the appropriate line to maintain a consistent line?
 

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I hate you Turn 4!
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Ask around, there is usually a couple of people that will tow you for a couple of laps to learns the lines and then let you at it on your own. Thats what I do when I go to a new track for the first time
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The no breaking drill seemed to work really welll for me. That was probably my favorite part. It was definitely a humbling experience. I am hooked for sure. I learned so much about riding in one day than I could ever imagine.

I have the track map now and keep on replaying each turn in my head. I should have stayed for the second day lol
 

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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #5
Ask around, there is usually a couple of people that will tow you for a couple of laps to learns the lines and then let you at it on your own. Thats what I do when I go to a new track for the first time
I am still in novice, which I am totally fine with. So I am sure I will need to just get some more experience. It was turn #7 that was killing me.
 

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"The Dude abides .. "
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anyone .. that is new to track riding or even thinking about track riding should by "Twist of the Wrist II" by keith code. just thought i would throw that out there, very very informative.
 

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My R6 is trouble.
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anyone .. that is new to track riding or even thinking about track riding should by "Twist of the Wrist II" by keith code. just thought i would throw that out there, very very informative.
:fact the first one is also great too, I have the hard copies but I also downloaded them on my phone, I like to read them when I get bored to stay refreshed and thinking


Sent from my Motorcycle iPhone app
 

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"The Dude abides .. "
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it can be difficlut, especially for new track riders coming from years of street riding. BUT, if you had a favorite twistie road you frequent you can apply what you might not even know you do.. to the track.
Picture that stretch of road and it's (lets just say) 15 turns. You know that at "the brown house" you need to start slowing and go down 2 gears. For example.
On the track it is VERY important to use brake markers. The boards that say "3" "2" "1" or "300"200"100" .. then there is a turn in point. For racers, we look for a pavement patch, perhaps the end of a rumble strip, something that is permanent that we know at that point we flick the bike over to initiate the turn. The faster you can get the bike on it's side the later you can start the turn.. and thus the longer your on the gas before the brakes preceding this turn.
 

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D-day prepper
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sometimes track markers arent always on the track for example in eagles canyon turn 5 the corner workers stand is a great marker
 

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TRAVELER
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+1 on all of the above. Once you have the lines, work on RPM management. Know what gear works well for each corner and being smooth at doing it too. Slow is smooth and smooth is fast. Look for markers throughout the track for shift points, braking points and also knowing how to preposition your body BEFORE the turn and not doing it mid turn. Lots to learn but that's the beauty of track riding. Once you think you figure it out, get a laptimer and see your time. The track is like a puzzle. Put them together smoothly and you'll see your laptimes go down. Just my 2 cents.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks gents for the great advice. I am signing up for the 24th and 25th of June. I will definitely read the book again prior to going. This next time, I am going to focus on the markers. There was so much going on for my first day...I think I got to caught up in throttle control. Which apparently was counter productive. If I would have had my lines right I am sure I would have been much smoother.
 

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"The Dude abides .. "
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watch on board video from someone that is somewhat good or VERY good. Lots of video on youtube these days.
And try to visualise the track and all the inputs you make for a lap (shifting, brakes, turn in points, etc). Most riders can't do it for 1 entire lap the first few times they try. But it's a great tool.
 

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for instance... my first time to NJMP.

I had a map of the course from their website and then i was watching you tube videos constantly checking the map to see where they were.


Then the first time you go out... go nice and slow but most importantly follow the lines that you learned.

With my local TD the track org Tony's Track Days does a follow the leader for any first timers. They go around the lap following the controlled rider and a slow pace showing the lines. It is very important that they stay on his but and follow his exact line even if it doesn't make sense at first.

However, when at speed you will be glad you practiced the right lines.
 
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