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Discussion Starter #1
My valves are heavily caked in carbon, so much so that it has to be affecting the fuel flow into the cylinder. Also afraid of it breaking apart and scoring the cylinder walls. I am planning on dropping the engine and removing the head to take to a shop to have them removed and cleaned. My experience ends at removing the cams. The shop wants $300 plus the cost of new valve seals to do the work if I just bring them the head. Little more than I want to spend on a bike that I am hoping I can sell in a year or 2.

So my question is how difficult is it to remove the valves and reinstall the valves? Does anybody know if these Pit Posse (or similar) $30 dollar compressors work with the R6 valves? Or do the ones you can rent from autozone work for these engines? Lastly, do I need to worry about lapping? On that note can someone explain lapping in layman's terms or point me to an instructional video, haha. Engine work is a little beyond my comfort level but mostly because I am too afraid to just get stuck in and learn.
 

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a $15 compressor would work... just tedious. You need to number the valves. What is really important is making sure all the components are in good condition and the springs arent fatiged. Youll need a spring scale to see that.
Its not hard to lap so long as the seats are good. I would fog the engine with steam and techron before tearing it down to clean carbon.
 

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Yep /\
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Turbo. Yea I'm not sure what I'm going to do yet. On one hand I want to tear the head off to give me a reason to just inspect things. Then figured this was a good time to get the valves cleaned as well. The benefit to taking it to a shop is they have a better eye and tools for detecting worn parts then I would (unless its clearly broken). But I can't justify the price on a bike I hopefully won't have for more than another year or 2. And who knows if cleaning the valves will even make the bike run better. But I do think it's effecting fuel flow like I mentioned since the fuel can't just run off the valves cleanly. Not familiar with the fogging method.

I'm just at the point where I am tired of stripping the bike down to find issues, then putting it all back together and going for a ride only to find it's still not running smoothly and do it all over. So figured lets just drop the engine, but it's not like I'll go any further then the head so not sure what the point is.

This is just 1 picture of cyl 1 intake. The picture does not do it justice. There is a ridge of carbon where a piece must of broken off. I could take a depth gauge to it that's how much carbon is there.

375837
 

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I also planned to clean my valves in the future.

But I think the job of grinding valves is tedious, and they told me it doesn't look right at all.

That not even the mechanics themselves do that, they take them to specialized stores.

But are you going to grind your cylinder head by hand? I understand that this has to be checked every time it is disassembled and rectified if necessary.

I had planned to buy a small ultrasound cleaning machine, they cost about $ 45 and with them you can clean the valves perfectly, of course not the cylinder head, but it could be taken by a site specialized in cleaning and grinding. I would think about grinding valves if I did it myself.

I follow this thread, it is interesting.

My valves:

375841


Ultrasonic cleaner:

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Regards.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I also planned to clean my valves in the future.

But I think the job of grinding valves is tedious, and they told me it doesn't look right at all.

That not even the mechanics themselves do that, they take them to specialized stores.

But are you going to grind your cylinder head by hand? I understand that this has to be checked every time it is disassembled and rectified if necessary.

I had planned to buy a small ultrasound cleaning machine, they cost about $ 45 and with them you can clean the valves perfectly, of course not the cylinder head, but it could be taken by a site specialized in cleaning and grinding. I would think about grinding valves if I did it myself.

I follow this thread, it is interesting.

Ultrasonic cleaner:

VLOXO Ultrasonic Cleaner Ultrasonic Jewellery Cleaner 600ml 50W 42khz Ultrasonic Bath Cleaner Machine for Jewelry Silver Ring Earring Necklace Glasses Watch Metal Coins Dentures Razors Tattoo Tools: Amazon.co.uk: DIY & Tools

Regards.
I wasn't going to grind anything. I was only going to have them cleaned. The only shop that ever got back to me said they can clean them with an ultrasonic cleaner. They just don't resurface anything. I didn't think you could grind these valves being titanium coated....?? (correct me if I am wrong).

If it gets to the point where anything major like the seats being bad or I need to do extra engine work that's going to cost money then I'm throwing in the towel and just parting it all out (just dreadful to even think about).

If I go through with it I'll be sure to follow up.
 

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now $120... what year bike?? The ti valves on the 2006+ run about $79 each. If the coating has worn... you need to replace. I would search ebay for like used components. I gave all my old ones to a buddy so i cant help ya there.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Good stuff, thanks Turbo. Care to enlighten how that steam cleaner can be used to clean the valves? Do you remove the head, soak them in techron then take the steam cleaner to them? Or remove the valves and soak and steam? Can you take a red scuff pad to these valves? I want to learn more and get confident with this stuff, so I am all ears.

And it's a 2007. I hope I don't have to replace any valves. That valve seals alone are expensive enough.
 

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no you remove airbox lid and start the bike... fog each cylinder with the steamer to decarbon. The stubborn stuff hit with the brushes. If you have to tear down... then get a spring comprssor. Youll need a headgasket, etc. Probably run a check of the valve clearances prior to teardown
 

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Doesn't do that unless it isn't running right. If the mechanics of timing/compression, air and fuel control are sound, you need to look at the tune. You may already have that in your plans post cleanup, but just wanted to make sure.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
no you remove airbox lid and start the bike... fog each cylinder with the steamer to decarbon. The stubborn stuff hit with the brushes. If you have to tear down... then get a spring comprssor. Youll need a headgasket, etc. Probably run a check of the valve clearances prior to teardown
Darn, unfortunately, I already have the thing stripped down and fluids out in prep for engine removal.
 

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Yeah, viton seals around $8-10 per. And 16 of the buggers get eaten up. Valves and valve springs will give you a stroke. I spent around $800 on new ex valves and 32 springs on a zx9r rebuild. Wouldn't hurt to lap all of them if you take the head off.
 

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But the cleanliness of the valves cannot affect the stagnation in the valve seat? If so, you would have to grind the valve with the seat. And if the valves have to be disassembled, wouldn't it be better to clean the valves with a small ultrasound machine like the one I put in?

If you do not have to grind valves, the steam engine would be a better option.

I suppose that if the cylinder head is in good condition, the simple disassembly would not affect its structure, is that true?

I wasn't going to grind anything. I was only going to have them cleaned. The only shop that ever got back to me said they can clean them with an ultrasonic cleaner. They just don't resurface anything. I didn't think you could grind these valves being titanium coated....?? (correct me if I am wrong).
Yes, I understand that a paste is used, I do not know the composition, it is placed on the clean valve and a lapping machine is used by turning it "as if you were trying to make fire" so that the seat and the valve are perfectly sealed.

There is the question, if cleaning the valves could affect that seal.

Thanks guys.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Yeah, viton seals around $8-10 per. And 16 of the buggers get eaten up. Valves and valve springs will give you a stroke. I spent around $800 on new ex valves and 32 springs on a zx9r rebuild. Wouldn't hurt to lap all of them if you take the head off.
Ouch, that's beyond my budget for sure. But yea, I will lap the valves if I do remove them. I didn't realize how easy lapping is until I saw a video. Pretty straightforward (just time-consuming) and just like all things engine related you just gotta pay attention to what you doing.
 

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Yes, then punch holes in a box to keep them in order as you remove. After lapping, just a dab of compound is plenty.. clean very good. It is diamond dust in grease and left in will chew up the stem guide. Then a smear of oil or assembly lube on stem to keep guide happy until normal oil passes the seal.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Alright, so I have been told that I should not lap my valves because it will remove the titanium coating. This might not be an issue with a race bike that gets torn down frequently but in a road bike that puts many miles on it this would end up destroying the valve. The manual also states to not use the valves that were used for lapping and to buy all new valves. So I guess this means if there is any sort of pitting or rough spots on the valves where they seat I got to buy new valves? Uggh I hate you Yamaha.
 

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My vales are titanium. Not coated. That blows no lapping of yours. Did you do a compression test?
 

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Alright, so I have been told that I should not lap my valves because it will remove the titanium coating. This might not be an issue with a race bike that gets torn down frequently but in a road bike that puts many miles on it this would end up destroying the valve. The manual also states to not use the valves that were used for lapping and to buy all new valves. So I guess this means if there is any sort of pitting or rough spots on the valves where they seat I got to buy new valves? Uggh I hate you Yamaha.
thats par for the course hence why I was telling you to look for good used ones. If a valve is that torn up... you'd best examine the seat really well.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
thats par for the course hence why I was telling you to look for good used ones. If a valve is that torn up... you'd best examine the seat really well.
I'll keep my eye out for some, but hoping I don't need any and just cleaning them will be enough to refresh and reinstall. But I'll buy some bluing dye and check the seats. I can't imagine the seats will be worn but I wonder if I can buy just a sacrificial valve for lapping the seats just to clean any rough surfaces.

My vales are titanium. Not coated. That blows no lapping of yours. Did you do a compression test?
I did. They were all about the same (185 PSI cold) but 1 and 2 took just a little longer to come up. I don't think I'll have an issue with the valves but we will see once I clean them up.
 
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