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RIDE HARD!!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so i'm trying to find a set of ramps so i can load my bike in the truck, i was wondering what you guys use? most of the ramps i find seem to be too narrow, maybe 12 inches? seems like it would be really hard to ride the bike up that and maintain balance... thanks for the help guys!
 

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I am sure alot of people are going to say you shouldnt ride your bike up the ramp. I always use 2 ramps one for the bike and one for me walking the bike up. I start the bike and put it in gear and walk the bike up the ramps instead of trying to push the bike up.
 

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RIDE HARD!!
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
hmm didn't think of doing it that way, and you can keep the bike balanced ok that way? what about backing it down?
 

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I have never had a problem with keeping it balanced loading and unloading that way. Only time it was sketchy was when it was wet out and the ramps were damp and while unloading the tires slid down the ramp while trying to keep the front brake applied. Just make sure your ramps are lined up right and the bike is centered on the ramps.
 

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Oorah!
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I have never had a problem with keeping it balanced loading and unloading that way. Only time it was sketchy was when it was wet out and the ramps were damp and while unloading the tires slid down the ramp while trying to keep the front brake applied. Just make sure your ramps are lined up right and the bike is centered on the ramps.
The easy fix to this that I found was to get some skateboard grip tape and apply to the ramps, both the one you walk on and the one the bike moves on.
 

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The easy fix to this that I found was to get some skateboard grip tape and apply to the ramps, both the one you walk on and the one the bike moves on.
That is true. I actually use some home made ramps. Some pressure treated 2x8's that have been line-x'd with the ramp kit you can buy at home depot. They are long but it helps with the anle not being so steep on the shorter ones. They have never bowed or flexed either before someone says thats not safe.
 

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So why isit a bad idea to ride the bike up the ramp? It seems pretty easy to me!
Well..if you've never done it before chances are you will approach the ramp too slow and midway up you'll get hesitant and the bike will either start to roll backwards or worse, the bike will start to tilt to the side and with nowhere to put your feet to gain balance, you and the bike will go tumbling off the side.:eek: If your riding the bike up the truck with only one narrow ramp, you better make sure you have adequate speed to carry you up because once you pass the point where your feet have nothing to anchor you and the bike down you had better be committed to making it up into the truck bed, or things could get ugly!

Trust me, it is scary as all hell if you've never done it before, especially if the ramp your using is anything less than say 100" in length as the shorter it is the steeper the incline, especially if you have a full size truck that is much higher off the ground than say, a Ford Ranger. I've ridden my 6 into the back of my Tundra using a ramp I got at Lowes (maybe 90" in length) and even though I made it up, it wasn't pretty and those couple seconds of me riding up the ramp definitely made my heart skip a beat or two!

If you could get a ramp that is around 110-120" long it would be alot less sketchy as the incline would be lessened considerably. Discount ramps sells some quality ramps, but they are pricey. Or perhaps you could pick up a couple of the Trackside ramps that Cycle Gear has on special and strap them together so you have the width of two ramps while riding it up as a safety buffer in the event you need to put a foot down before making it all the way up. This would definitely be the ideal scenario if you plan on riding the bike down from the truck because you will certainly need to stabilize the bike by having at least one foot down on the ramp.
 

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RIDE HARD!!
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well..if you've never done it before chances are you will approach the ramp too slow and midway up you'll get hesitant and the bike will either start to roll backwards or worse, the bike will start to tilt to the side and with nowhere to put your feet to gain balance, you and the bike will go tumbling off the side.:eek: If your riding the bike up the truck with only one narrow ramp, you better make sure you have adequate speed to carry you up because once you pass the point where your feet have nothing to anchor you and the bike down you had better be committed to making it up into the truck bed, or things could get ugly!

Trust me, it is scary as all hell if you've never done it before, especially if the ramp your using is anything less than say 100" in length as the shorter it is the steeper the incline, especially if you have a full size truck that is much higher off the ground than say, a Ford Ranger. I've ridden my 6 into the back of my Tundra using a ramp I got at Lowes (maybe 90" in length) and even though I made it up, it wasn't pretty and those couple seconds of me riding up the ramp definitely made my heart skip a beat or two!

If you could get a ramp that is around 110-120" long it would be alot less sketchy as the incline would be lessened considerably. Discount ramps sells some quality ramps, but they are pricey. Or perhaps you could pick up a couple of the Trackside ramps that Cycle Gear has on special and strap them together so you have the width of two ramps while riding it up as a safety buffer in the event you need to put a foot down before making it all the way up. This would definitely be the ideal scenario if you plan on riding the bike down from the truck because you will certainly need to stabilize the bike by having at least one foot down on the ramp.
right, well thats why i was considering buying an extra wide ramp, that i could keep my feet down as i ride the bike up and down the ramp...
 

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AFM #327
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a pair of ramps and a friend to help you out is what you need while loading. Usually at the track, plenty of folks to help unload. My wife helps me when I load it in my truck. I used to have the Steel ramps from harbor freight that ^^^ mentioned for ~$50/pair, but I thought they were a bit shorter than what I ideally wanted and also heavy, so I sold them. Now I wanna get some folding Aluminum ramps kinda like the ones Cyclegear had on sale a while back. For me, its definitely a two man job to load and unload off a truck. For a trailer though, just one person is enough.
 

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My R6 eats you.
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Pick it up and toss it in there you pussy.
 
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