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mine is better than yours
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664 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
ok, riding home today...i kinda got lazy with my technique and ended up completely screwing up a corner. i dont know how really to explain it...srry...but what i ended up doing was riding the uncomfortable position out. i was afraid to unsettle the bike leaned over like that being it felt pretty un-nerving. my question is: if your technique gets pretty screwed up, should you fix it mid corner (and possiblely unsettle the bike) or just ride it out??

hope this made sense :dunce:
 

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U.S. Marine
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1,099 Posts
I was riding the turnpike last summer and a very similar experience. Not an expert by any means but it all depends on the situation itself. I'd say stick to the position especially if you are in mid-corner. My experience, I was passing this ***fayce in the right hand lane on a right hand corner. He was directly to my left so instead of shifting my weight I just rode it out and never saw him again.
 

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click, click, vroom!
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872 Posts
while i am curious how you screwed up the corner ... if you were committed to it enough to lean in on it pretty good, stick with where you are. once the suspension is settled in to what you're doing and you're already down in a corner, about to apex out, you're committed. stay there. it might feel wrong and it might not look good but it's better than unloading the suspension and getting bucked off.

my $.02
 

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mine is better than yours
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664 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
ok, ill try my best to explain it. it felt as though i was putting way too much of my weight on the inside peg...like if i was going to 'push' the bike from out under me. fixing it would have required me to push myself up a little back onto the seat.

hope that helped
 

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mine is better than yours
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664 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
while i am curious how you screwed up the corner ... if you were committed to it enough to lean in on it pretty good, stick with where you are. once the suspension is settled in to what you're doing and you're already down in a corner, about to apex out, you're committed. stay there. it might feel wrong and it might not look good but it's better than unloading the suspension and getting bucked off.

my $.02
thats the same thing i was thinking...i figured it was too late to do any fixing at that point
 

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Dragging Knee
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1,604 Posts
Sounds like by moving your body positioning would have added more lean angle to the bike as you would have raised the center of gravity and that is not a good idea mid corner at the apex.

Now if it is to get your body further off the bike to lower the center of gravity that would be alright to make that move but do it smoothly as to not to unsettle the bike.
 

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crashing aint so bad
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2,271 Posts
There is a million different ways to look at it. I try to live by simple rules. There is no point in trying to fix what you already messed up. If you turn to early you will apex to soon and you will have a wide line out of the turn. There is nothing you can do once you have dedicated that line. Now as far as body positioning goes you can change it. But what it will gain you is another discussion. Basically you can change your body position all you want any time you want. will it upset the suspension; likley yes, but to a problematic, or beneficial degree, who knows. The rule I go by is to divert all attention to the next immediate task. If your body position is all out of whack but you are already in the turn, forget about it and focus on when you can get back on the gas, where you will apex, how much gas you will give the bike and where you will exit at. In that time frame you will likley have no real ill effects of the botched body position. Perhaps more lean angle will be used. Provided you do everything else like you are supposed to that extra lean angle won't matter anyway. So sticking to the rules is the safe bet. Don't try to fix what is already wrong, just deal with it.

Riding a bike is like writing with a pen through a maze that has only a single path from beggining to end ( like a race track ). You can do anything you you want with the pen in the path but you can't erase the mistakes untill the next try. The basic rule is simple though. you are dedicated to what you have DONE and will have to focus on what you will do from that point on. This is of course easier said than done. It is something to work on. Try to be one step ahead of where you are at and if you mess up on one step focus on making the next step right.
 

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mine is better than yours
Joined
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664 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
There is a million different ways to look at it. I try to live by simple rules. There is no point in trying to fix what you already messed up. If you turn to early you will apex to soon and you will have a wide line out of the turn. There is nothing you can do once you have dedicated that line. Now as far as body positioning goes you can change it. But what it will gain you is another discussion. Basically you can change your body position all you want any time you want. will it upset the suspension; likley yes, but to a problematic, or beneficial degree, who knows. The rule I go by is to divert all attention to the next immediate task. If your body position is all out of whack but you are already in the turn, forget about it and focus on when you can get back on the gas, where you will apex, how much gas you will give the bike and where you will exit at. In that time frame you will likley have no real ill effects of the botched body position. Perhaps more lean angle will be used. Provided you do everything else like you are supposed to that extra lean angle won't matter anyway. So sticking to the rules is the safe bet. Don't try to fix what is already wrong, just deal with it.

Riding a bike is like writing with a pen through a maze that has only a single path from beggining to end ( like a race track ). You can do anything you you want with the pen in the path but you can't erase the mistakes untill the next try. The basic rule is simple though. you are dedicated to what you have DONE and will have to focus on what you will do from that point on. This is of course easier said than done. It is something to work on. Try to be one step ahead of where you are at and if you mess up on one step focus on making the next step right.

the master has spoken! :lmao great info man, thanx.

Don't try to fix what is already wrong, just deal with it.
thats what i was thinking at the time. i think what i did was starting setting up too late, and rushed my position. now when i get ready, i make sure to set up at the right time, if not a little early...and now im getting every turn perfect, if not better than before :toocool:
 

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crashing aint so bad
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2,271 Posts
The object in reality is to try and slow things down. The less attention you have ahead of where you are at the more time you spend making quick decisions on what to immediatley do. This leads to mistakes and the feeling of always being rushed. This errodes rider confidence and frankly will scare the crap out of you eventually.

The more attention that you have spent ahead of where you are at the more time you have to make any decision at all. This slows things down to the point where you actually have time to think about things beyond your next move. You will have a bigger picture that is in higher definition. This will increase confidence and reduce the feeling of speed. All this also allows you to go faster and not really be concentrated on the speed. You are looking further through the turns so obsticals are evaded sooner in your mind and the road looks to be going slower. The lack of being rushed will also help you relax.

Being relaxed is the key to smoothness and feeling the bike. When realaxed, the grip on the bars is minimal and this reduces the feeling of the road. What you will feel is the feedback you really want like where traction is at. When you are squeezing the bars to death every pebble you run over becomes the edge of traction. your brain is in overload analyzing all the information your hands are feeding it. Relaxing will also help make your intended bar inputs happen easier. This is because you won't be fighting yourself because of tense arms and hands. Keep at it and hope all this helps.
 
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