Yamaha R6 Forum: YZF-R6 Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
I ride like I mean it
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have never even peeked at the battery on my 99 R6 since buying it second or maybe third hand 4 years ago. Recently, I have three bothersome episodes which are clearly battery related and I assume means that it is in need of replacement...?

Firstly, I left the lights on for 10 minutes whilst cleaning the chain. When I went to restart there was hardly any energy left. I needed a bump start.

The same thing happened twice since, both times when I have left the lights one, once just for 2 minutes!!

Does this pretty much confirm that I need a new battery??? Must I purchase a charger as well??

Can anyone recommend a decently priced option for purchasing in Australia???
(I am in Melbourne, but assume it might be cheaper to purchase online)

I was going to grab one of these>>>
http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/310610851187?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2648

And will this battery do??>>>
http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/UT9B-4-Y..._Parts_Accessories&hash=item3cdb25930c&_uhb=1
 

·
I ride like I mean it
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Cheers, mate. Both ordered.

Probably best to get the thing changed before I head off for 6 weeks to my motherland of Europe.

Before leaving this alone...Does a battery on it's way out affect performance in any way??? I always assumed it was used almost exclusively for electric ignition, and once the engine was running, the power was generated elsewhere??
 

·
I ride like I mean it
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I couldn't resist the eagerness to charge the thing the day it arrived. So did so overnight. Disconnected the charger then realized I would not be installing it until Saturday.

Does it matter that I have let the battery sit there, fully charged in the lounge for several days? Should I charge it again overnight before fitting it tomorrow?
 

·
I eat what my R6 cooks!
Joined
·
2,489 Posts
I couldn't resist the eagerness to charge the thing the day it arrived. So did so overnight. Disconnected the charger then realized I would not be installing it until Saturday.

Does it matter that I have let the battery sit there, fully charged in the lounge for several days? Should I charge it again overnight before fitting it tomorrow?
Battery should be fine as it is. If a battery goes dead in a week outside the bike, you need to send it back because it has problems of its own.
 

·
I ride like I mean it
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
After buying the battery, and fully charging it, I rode the bike for a week, then put the bike in my garden with a half decent cover to keep the rain off before heading overseas on a 6 week jaunt around europe. I am set to return in ten days and am wondering if I need to remove the battery and charge it once again, or if it should have retained enough charge to start and then once ridden it will creep back up to its full capacity?

Is this the case?

Would a new, fully charged battery be fine and dandy if not used for 6 weeks? And when it was used again would its capacity be the same as before, just in need of charging via the bike itself after returning to daily use? I only have a vague idea of what rpm is needed to charge the batter, but my understanding is that its charge will have dropped, especially in the melbourne winter, but its capacity will head back up once I start using it again?

Is it best to remove and charge or simply get back into daily riding and it will be as wonderful soon enough as it was just after I charged and installed it 5 weeks back?

any help is appreciated. cheers, TGP>
 

·
I ride like I mean it
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, I've returned to icy Melbourne and after been left outside without usage these last 6 weeks the battery is entirely dead. No surprise?

I am giving it a full charge now with my 1 amp charger. How long should it take? Will it do any damage if I leave it charging overnight? I.e. still connected to charger after it has reached fill charge?

Lastly, will it's recent 6 week outside no usage winter experience have damaged the cells in any way?

I tried charging it for 20 mins earlier but not joy, so I will now leave it overnight and hope for the best.

Should it return to life, bearing in mind it was new two months back?
 

·
I eat what my R6 cooks!
Joined
·
2,489 Posts
If it is a peak detecting charger(like a battery tender), just leave it overnight and it should do its job. If it is NOT a peak detecting charger, keep an eye on it and you should probably disconnect it after about 6 hours. If your charger doesnt detect that it is fully charged and it keeps trying to charge it more, it could damage the battery. If I remember right, the batteries are roughly 8 amps. If you unplug it after 6 hours or so, it should be charged at least 75% of the way. Then just toss it in the bike and see if it starts. If so, go for a nice long ride and it will charge up the rest of the way over time. If it doesn't start, take it back inside and throw it on the charger for another hour or so. The other option(and probably the best choice) is to just go buy a battery tender. It will stop charging when the battery is fully charged, and then maintain the battery when you arent riding.
 

·
I ride like I mean it
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I charged it overnight, stuck it in this morning. The power was there, yet the bike took a fair while to start.

I have since taken it for a 30 minute ride and will do so again this afternoon. The acceleration seems odd, sluggish low down, perhaps just due to old petrol or the oil is also old and soggy?

Is this just a result of the bike sitting in the cold for so long? Will riding hard return the acceleration to how it was?

Since the bike took a fair while to start, does that mean the battery capacity has been lessened and I need to charge it again? Or will the bike's charging system return the battery to full capacity as I ride?

I am planning on changing the oil and oil filter this weekend...which should help matters?
 

·
I eat what my R6 cooks!
Joined
·
2,489 Posts
Bear with me here. I am going to try to address the things in the order you asked.

It probably took a while to start because the petrol may have started to go bad. How old is the petrol that is currently in it? When you filled it, did you put any stabilizer in it?

The sluggish response could be due to the petrol going bad in conjunction with clogging up some of the carb jets. I really doubt the oil is the issue, but it probably wouldn't hurt to put fresh oil in there.

The sluggishness could be the result of the petrol going bad if it has been in there a fair while. If there is petrol in the carbs and it goes bad, it can clog up the jets. This will result in poor performance. Over time, riding will probably help the issue, but there is no guarantee. I may catch some shit for this, but I would recommend buying a bottle of "Seafoam Motor Treatment". Click this link to see what it looks like.(http://i.walmartimages.com/i/p/00/01/88/12/00/0001881200001_500X500.jpg) There is no guarantee the Seafoam will work, but I have had good luck with it. It works as a stabilizer, and I feel it has helped out when I had a dirtbike that was tough to start. After about half a tank, the bike would start first kick.

The battery capacity should be fine. The charging system should take care of the battery as long as you are riding it with some consistency.

The oil may help, but I wouldn't expect changing it to be a fix to everything. Either way, change it. It isn't going to hurt anything if you change it.
 

·
I ride like I mean it
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Many thanks, jebova...for the detailed and welcome response!

I was not previously aware of how petrol could break down poorly if left in a tank over time. Yet I am convinced it was merely the petrol, or perhaps the fact that the bike had been left out in the cold melbourne winter without usage for more than 6 weeks.

I guess I cam to assume that the power core was like an elastic band, and it needed stretching slowly but firmly, so after filling up a new tank of petrol yesterday, the cheap Shell 91 product, I went for a decent ride, and wherever I felt a sluggish spot on the revs, I revisited. I took the bike to work this morning at 7am and it was much better. The ride home was even more pleasing...I had forgotten how quick the beast accelerates even at low revs. Such a shame that there are so many police and cameras at large here, for I am well aware that the real joy comes higher up the revs!

It has been nearly 7 months since I changed the oil and 12 months since I changed the filter so will do both this weekend. As you say, it certainly cannot do any harm.

The beast is old, and after changing mechanics before my holiday to get the carbs properly balanced I was uneasy to learn that the valves were somewhat ****ed. Yet as the scouse grease merchant said 'if you are happy with the bike the way it is, do the oil changes, filter changes, keep the chain maintained and it will remain a weapon on the road...'. And I agree!

Its ****ing wonderful to be back on two r6 wheels...
 

·
I eat what my R6 cooks!
Joined
·
2,489 Posts
Many thanks, jebova...for the detailed and welcome response!

I was not previously aware of how petrol could break down poorly if left in a tank over time. Yet I am convinced it was merely the petrol, or perhaps the fact that the bike had been left out in the cold melbourne winter without usage for more than 6 weeks.

I guess I cam to assume that the power core was like an elastic band, and it needed stretching slowly but firmly, so after filling up a new tank of petrol yesterday, the cheap Shell 91 product, I went for a decent ride, and wherever I felt a sluggish spot on the revs, I revisited. I took the bike to work this morning at 7am and it was much better. The ride home was even more pleasing...I had forgotten how quick the beast accelerates even at low revs. Such a shame that there are so many police and cameras at large here, for I am well aware that the real joy comes higher up the revs!

It has been nearly 7 months since I changed the oil and 12 months since I changed the filter so will do both this weekend. As you say, it certainly cannot do any harm.

The beast is old, and after changing mechanics before my holiday to get the carbs properly balanced I was uneasy to learn that the valves were somewhat ****ed. Yet as the scouse grease merchant said 'if you are happy with the bike the way it is, do the oil changes, filter changes, keep the chain maintained and it will remain a weapon on the road...'. And I agree!

Its ****ing wonderful to be back on two r6 wheels...
Glad to hear things are working out for you!
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top