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IDGAF
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People are always talking about how to become more confident riders. What skill would you say is the most likely to improve your overall confidence?

Misti
:swordfigh
….:grin::wink:…..im not even gonna go there.0:)

It's not really a skill per se, but I'm still working on trying to have more faith in the tires. After totaling a bike……
I see my dad (who is 5'6", 220lbs, 61yrs old), on a ZZR1200 leave me in the dust on some curves. With that being said, I feel like seat time on a track is the main thing that would improve my confidence (being a track virgin) learning the limitations of the tires, and listening to instruction from those who know. I realize that doesn't really help you, but that's my .02
 

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Yamaha 4 Life
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I would say vision is number one, and for riders who have done only street riding, can be a hard thing to learn.

Second I would say is body position. Position yourself well on the bike, and she will be have accordingly.

Finally, any rider who has not been to the track, should go. Want to learn more in one day than you will learn in a year on the street, do a track day.
 

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Hey...watch this
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I have a lot of confidence in my braking ability, both into and trail-braking right up to the apex. Like was said earlier, I need to get more confidence in my tires, which is why I'm upgrading to slicks next year.
 

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Yamaha 4 Life
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Riding on the street is almost boring. Unless you are lucky enough to live near some unpopulated mountain roads.
Couldnt agree more, hence why I sold my street bike earlier this year and do strictly track now. Even with unpopulated mountain roads, still have too many variables to be concerned with.

Like was said earlier, I need to get more confidence in my tires, which is why I'm upgrading to slicks next year.
Hear that loud and clear. Finishing off the current set of DRC's I am on and then I will be giving the Superbike Pro's a shot.
 

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Looking ahead and not ever thinking about crashing while racing. You need to concentrate on what is going on around you and be able to process things quickly.
 

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track junkie
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crashing. once you figure out that it doesn't really hurt too bad, you can get a lot more crazy on the bike. learning really accelerates when you're not afraid to fall off...
 

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For me on track it was a combination of things:
Switching from street to race slicks enabled me to get on the gas way earlier in the corner giving me confidence in the level of grip they provide
More time on track ,last year I did two track days a month putting on 4000 kilometre of track time in under two years
Looking through the corner not at the clip in point , after sighting the clip in and aiming for it I looked through to the next corner
Getting my body positioning and weight distribution correct which resulted in knee down which lets you know your lean angle
Breathing , and getting comfortable with high speed
Getting advice from instructors and racers and implementing it ,not just some bloke in the next pit box
And yes after a couple of low side crashes , getting that out of the way and realising it was no big deal then analysing what caused it and taking measures to prevent it .
Smooth controlled braking ,consistent brake maker zones ,trail braking out of the corner, judicial throttle application , learning to use the rear brake
through corners to tightened the turning ark and settle the rear under hard acceleration out of the corner.

Oh and too smile have fun and not get stressed by other faster riders and being overtaken by surprise.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
crashing. once you figure out that it doesn't really hurt too bad, you can get a lot more crazy on the bike. learning really accelerates when you're not afraid to fall off...
Seriously? Not sure that crashing gives confidence. I've gone down a lot while racing and been lucky that most of them didn't hurt too bad but I certainly wouldn't say that it gave me any more confidence. The confidence I gain comes from knowing how to ride properly and knowing that I have the skills to save me from a crash if I do get into a bit of trouble.

For me, the visual skills give me the most confidence. If I know exactly where I want to be and where exactly I'm going then my perception of speed is better, I feel like I'm going slower and so I'm less afraid.

Misti
 

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crashing. once you figure out that it doesn't really hurt too bad, you can get a lot more crazy on the bike. learning really accelerates when you're not afraid to fall off...
I think that in some ways, you're totally right on. And if I may, I would say that its not necessarily the crashing, but more knowing why you crashed, how to avoid it again, and knowing where that ragged edge is. Its like a reference point. I guess I would say its one of those things that you can prepare for but you only know what to do once youre in the heat of the moment. Kind of like child birth, war, or the first time you get your pecker wet. More experience.... And you ultimately know if you're leaving something on the table or not..... Once I crashed a few times, even bad crashes, in the dirt and knew it was shitty but survivable, I sucked it up and started trying to huck the triples. When you have a reference point of fear, pain, performance, and advantage, it really becomes less an exercise of surviving and more of putting the bike where you need it to be for the given situation, and knowing just what you can and cant get away with. I'll tell you this, I learned damn quick that you dont hesitate in the corner before a 110' triple on a stock 125. Unless you like busted lips, chipped teeth, and bruised testicles. Sometimes you have to commit. Simple as that.
 

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Yamaha 4 Life
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I think that in some ways, you're totally right on. And if I may, I would say that its not necessarily the crashing, but more knowing why you crashed, how to avoid it again
Agreed.

I have had a few wrecks out on the track and learned something from all of them. Well, thats a lie. I didnt learn anything valuable from the time when some dumb shit rear ended me at the end of the straight other than you never know what to expect :)

Anyhow, each of my crashes taught me something valuable and I walked away having learned a lesson and taking with me something I would apply going forward.

Crashing sucks, and if you keep doing it, it may be time to find a different hobby before you regret it. But if you can learn from your crashes and subsequently crash less, you are getting it.
 

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+1 to crashing sucking..... But without the sour, the sweet just isnt as sweet....
 

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Meh
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Seriously? Not sure that crashing gives confidence. I've gone down a lot while racing and been lucky that most of them didn't hurt too bad but I certainly wouldn't say that it gave me any more confidence. The confidence I gain comes from knowing how to ride properly and knowing that I have the skills to save me from a crash if I do get into a bit of trouble.

For me, the visual skills give me the most confidence. If I know exactly where I want to be and where exactly I'm going then my perception of speed is better, I feel like I'm going slower and so I'm less afraid.

Misti
I would say the confidence instilled by the crash is inversely proportional to the amount of hurt dished out. Especially if you haven't crashed before.

First time I crashed at the track was almost completely painless. Had to pull a shift lever off and get it bent back into shape, and managed to get out and ride the rest of the day. I'd say there's definitely a bit of "oh hey, that wasn't something I have to be afraid of." And hopefully you were paying attention and learned something important about where the limit is. I was definitely getting signs of my upcoming get-off before it happened, but wasn't really sure what it was, or how much I should pay attention to it until I went down. Now I am very familiar with what a greasy rear tire feels like, and that I shouldn't blindly ride through it and try to go faster. :laugh

On the other hand, my most recent crash involved broken bones, collapsed lung, multi-day stay in the hospital, and a long recovery. I'm still working on getting my mojo back after that one. I did learn an important lesson about how sportbikes make terrible dirtbikes.
 

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+1 to crashing sucking..... But without the sour, the sweet just isnt as sweet....
lol... the only thing "crashing" has done for me is illustrate how important better gear is. The caveat was Im not emotionally damaged from it either.
I have friends that are still traumatized from crashes they caused from their own SRs. They are unwilling to accept that their bike might come back to the pits in a tractor bucket. :wink:
 

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lol... the only thing "crashing" has done for me is illustrate how important better gear is. The caveat was Im not emotionally damaged from it either.
I have friends that are still traumatized from crashes they caused from their own SRs. They are unwilling to accept that their bike might come back to the pits in a tractor bucket. :wink:
Yeah, I believe in wearing gear. I wear a helmet on a 50 in my back yard. A JR50. But then my kid wont raise a vegetable out of me, so whatever. But I feel you. I knocked out a tooth on my 450 riding a 5th gear wheelie on the river bar. Went off a little drop off and whiskeyed it a little and over she went. Broke the front and rear fenders off, bent the pipe, twisted the clamps.....Knocked me cold. I came to on the ground, my friend telling his girl to call 911. Tasted blood in my mouth and reached up in there and pulled a tooth out of my mouth. Still have the tooth.

And my black gsxr ended up in a tractor bucket eventually.....before it went into the landfill. RIP. :laugh
 

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People are always talking about how to become more confident riders. What skill would you say is the most likely to improve your overall confidence?

Misti
:swordfigh
Being able to hand off the bike more without feeling like I'm going to fall off the bike.
Proper body position/getting off the bike more. Is next on my list of things to improve. I had a friend of mine that is an instructor follow me on his stock cbr600. Just not getting off the bike enough thus dragging my toe on the ground. He's not dragging his toe but his elbows are getting close to the ground.
 

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Being able to hand off the bike more without feeling like I'm going to fall off the bike.
Proper body position/getting off the bike more. Is next on my list of things to improve. I had a friend of mine that is an instructor follow me on his stock cbr600. Just not getting off the bike enough thus dragging my toe on the ground. He's not dragging his toe but his elbows are getting close to the ground.
you need to work on your footing then. Body position follows that...and of course corner speed.
 

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Your mom eats my r6!!!
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Hitting my lines consistently on a track day is something I am working towards and feel that it will help out with other skill sets as well... Last track day my instructor said my BP and corner entry speed were good. Just needed to work on hitting my lines. I feel like if u know how to put the bike where it needs to be, all other skill sets will fall into place with practice. It's funny... My instructor laughed about it. He said I was laying down quicker lap times when he was behind me and I was off my lines, compared to me following him and hitting every line. I guess the feeling of playing "chase/catch up" compared to me just nailing it solo, threw me off a bit... All in all... PRACTICE!!!! It's what makes the biggest difference.


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